Breakout Sessions

There's something for everyone in this year's schedule. Check out a growing list of the breakout sessions we're offering in Orlando, and check back frequently as many more programs are announced and more details become available!


Additional Training Opportunities: NBCUniversity

NBCUniversity is a one-day intensive workshop, geared toward on-air and off-air conference attendees, taught by NBCU “professors” for individuals at all levels of their career. The coursework includes a variety of classes, from scripts to digital reporting. Participants will learn all they need to know to graduate to the next level of their career. Workshop space is limited and requires an application and selection process. Get all the details and apply today right here.

Branding Yourself in a Changing Journalism Landscape

More than ever, media outlets are undergoing restructuring and staffing changes. To be successful in today's communication landscape, you must have a strong brand. This session will give you the knowledge and tools you need to brand yourself, whether you are a broadcast, print, online or freelance media professional. You'll be more able to find new assignments, jobs, contacts and resources to keep you happy and fed as a professional journalist. Included in this presentation are interviews and data from a variety of journalists who have successfully rebranded themselves and found new success.

Trainers: Jeff Cutler, social media expert and journalist; Robyn Davis Sekula, communications consultant, journalist, and president, SPJ Louisville Pro Chapter

Click for speaker information
Jeff Cutler, social media expert and journalist
Jeff Cutler is a freelance journalist, social media trainer and content specialist who speaks regularly on content marketing, the use of social tools for journalists and businesses, and the best ways to brand your product, service or self. While he curates and writes for more than a dozen blogs, Jeff has written for NPR, The NY Post, Technology Review, Mobile Magazine, Gatehouse Media and more. Jeff has spoken at BlogWorld Expo, SXSW, various PodCamps, dozens of journalism conferences and content events. Jeff also keynoted the Cable Communicators of America annual conference and regularly appears on radio and television programs to provide insight into social media tools. The most comprehensive way to see Jeff's world is by going to jeffcutler.com.

Robyn Davis Sekula, communications consultant, journalist, and president, SPJ Louisville Pro Chapter
Robyn Davis Sekula is a communications and social media consultant who lives in the Louisville, Kentucky, area. She is also President of the SPJ Louisville Pro chapter and serves as chair of the SPJ Membership Committee. She primarily consults with organizations and business in communications, social media, public relations and marketing and is a frequent speaker. Robyn was a courts and crime reporter in North Carolina, a business editor in Missouri and a business reporter in Kentucky before launching her freelance writing and consulting career in 2003. She counts among her clients law firms, national-level non-profits, small businesses and government entities. You can find her web site at www.robyndavissekula.com and follow her on Twitter @itsRobynwithay.


Virtual Reality Tools for Journalism (And Your Newsroom)

Virtual Reality has been promised for decades, but it appears this time it’s, well, real. Ranging from Oculus Rift to Google Cardboard, or from 360 video to immersive games, journalists need to embrace this emerging technology and start experimenting to define what VR journalism could be. In this session for everyone from front-line reporters to high-level news managers, learn about the gear and how to produce engaging VR projects, even on a budget.

Trainer: Robert Hernandez (@webjournalist), journalism professor, USC, and co-founder of #WJCHAT

Click for speaker information
Robert Hernandez, journalism professor, USC, and co-founder of #WJCHAT
Robert Hernandez has made a name for himself as a journalist OF the web, not just on the web. His primary focus is exploring and developing the intersection of technology and journalism — to empower people, inform reporting and storytelling, engage community, improve distribution and, whenever possible, enhance revenue. He is an Associate Professor of Professional Practice at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. But he’s not an academic...he’s more of a “hackademic” and specializes in “MacGyvering” web journalism solutions. He connects dots and people. He has worked for seattletimes.com, SFGate.com, eXaminer.com and La Prensa Gráfica, among others. He’s also the co-founder of #wjchat and creator of Learn Code for Journalism with Me project. His most recent work has included Augmented Reality, Wearables/Google Glass and Virtual Reality. He is currently serving on the Online News Association board and is a lifetime member of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.


Breaking the Information Roadblock

Police who don't want to be videotaped. Bureaucrats who won't turn loose of public records. Journalists face daily barriers to access that, with a little legal knowledge, can (usually) be overcome. Two veteran media lawyers will explain the law of access, work through common news-gathering scenarios and handle your toughest stumpers on the spot.

Trainers: Frank LoMonte, executive director, Student Press Law Center; Sara Ganim, correspondent, CNN

Click for speaker information
Sara Ganim, correspondent, CNN
Sara Ganim is a CNN correspondent based in New York, covering a wide-range of stories and investigations across many platforms. Her recent reporting includes the various NCAA reform efforts, including Northwestern University football players' petition to unionize and the whistle-blower whose research on athletes' literacy caused a firestorm of controversy at the University of North Carolina.

In 2012, she joined CNN from The Patriot News in Harrisburg, Pa, where she broke the story of the grand jury investigation into Jerry Sandusky, the former defensive coordinator for the storied Penn State University football program. Her reporting of Sandusky's child sex abuse scandal that enveloped the school, head coach Joe Paterno and Sandusky's Second Mile Charity garnered a Pulitzer Prize in 2012.

Ganim holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Penn State University. In 2011, she was honored with the George Polk Award in journalism and the Sidney Award for socially conscious journalism.

Frank LoMonte, executive director, Student Press Law Center
Frank LoMonte joined the Student Press Law Center as executive director in January 2008 after practicing law with Atlanta-based Sutherland LLP and clerking for federal judges on the Northern District of Georgia and the Eleventh Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals. Before law school, LoMonte was an investigative journalist and political columnist for daily newspapers in Florida and Georgia. LoMonte graduated magna cum laude from the University of Georgia School of Law, where he was a senior editor of the Georgia Law Review. His articles about the First Amendment and media-law topics have been widely published in Education Week, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Slate, and in many other outlets.


Sports Beat Reporting: Develop Unique Ideas and Tell Great Multi-Platform Stories

Sports beat reporters are being asked to do more than ever for their publications, displaying a unique mix of skills that make them invaluable for any newsroom. During this session we'll discuss the top five keys to success for aspiring beat reporters and those already holding those rolls. We'll cover the top five tools of the trade that can help reporters succeed: time management, source development, story development, multimedia storytelling and social media skills.

Trainer: Iliana Limón Romero, college sports editor and pro soccer editor, Orlando Sentinel and Sun Sentinel

Click for speaker information
Iliana Limón Romero, college sports editor and pro soccer editor, Orlando Sentinel and Sun Sentinel
Iliana Limón Romero is the college sports and soccer editor for the Orlando Sentinel and South Florida Sun Sentinel. She supervises eight reporters who cover Florida, Florida State, Miami, UCF and other college programs. She also coordinates the Orlando Sentinel's coverage of new Major League Soccer club Orlando City. Her team has won multiple awards for its breaking news, features and analysis. Limón Romero worked as a crime and public safety reporter for The Albuquerque Tribune before switching to reporting on college athletics. Limón Romero joined the Orlando Sentinel in 2007 and worked as the newspapers University of Central Florida athletics reporter until taking on her current editing role in 2010.


Storyboarding Down the Mountain

The multimedia landscape can be daunting, particularly when you have to jump right in and face sound clips, video clips, hardware, software and a wide range of equipment. One way to divine some order from the chaos is to use storyboards to help plan, collect,, order and produce video and multimedia stories, just like they do in the movies. It doesn't have to be complicated. We will show you tips and techniques to help you find the right approach to use storyboards to fit your needs.

Trainers: Jack Zibluk, professor, Southeast Missouri

Click for speaker information
Jack Zibluk, professor, Southeast Missouri
Dr. Zibluk teaches multimedia journalism, he is a former National Geographic Magazine faculty fellow and vice president of the NationalPress Photographers Association. He won the NPPA Garland educator of the year Award in 2005.


Affordable Care Act at 5: What's New, What's Next?

Five years after it became law, the Affordable Care Act continues to be an important story for many residents and businesses in the communities that we cover. The ability to understand and report clearly on the health care law and its implications is crucial for journalists. This session will to help attendees better cover these issues and others related to the law. We'll share key elements of the law, including what new requirements will become effective in 2016. We'll also help attendees identify potential story topics for their newsroom, including stories affecting communities of color and people from low-income areas.

Moderator: April Bethea (@AprilBethea), online producer, The Charlotte Observer

Speakers: Sandra Gonzalez (@SandraGonzalez2), general assignment reporter, KSNV-TV; Laura Pichardo-Cruz, managing attorney, Community Legal Services of Mid Florida

Click for speaker information
April Bethea, online producer, The Charlotte Observer
April Bethea is an online producer at The Charlotte Observer and chair of SPJ's diversity committee. She has worked for the Observer since 2005 and covered a variety of beats before joining the online team. She's also vice president of the Greater Charlotte chapter of the Society of Professional Journalist and a member and former chapter officer of the National Association of Black Journalists.

Sandra Gonzalez, general assignment reporter, KSNV-TV
Sandra Gonzalez is the former chair of the SPJ Diversity Committee and a member of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. Gonzalez is a general assignment reporter at KSNV-TV in Las Vegas. In 2013, Gonzalez was assigned to cover the Affordable Care Act for the television station. Her stories have explained what's in the law, the problems in rolling out some state exchanges, and the impact of the law on minority or lower-income families. Gonzalez joined KSNV in 2012 after previously working in New Orleans, Bakersfield, and Dallas/Fort Worth.

Laura Pichardo-Cruz, managing attorney, Community Legal Services of Mid Florida
Laura Pichardo-Cruz is managing attorney at Community Legal Services of Mid Florida, where she has worked since 2007. CLS is a team of attorneys who provide free legal aid to low-income families in central Florida, serving more than 30,000 people each year. In recent years, the organization's advocates have helped Floridians understand their rights under the Affordable Care Act and helped raise awareness of the so-called 'coverage gap' where some residents are not eligible for Medicaid nor Affordable Care Act subsidies. Before joining the organization, Pichardo-Cruz was a staff attorney at Latinos Progresando in the Greater Chicago area and at Catholic Charities in Florida, according to her LinkedIn bio.


Nervous As Hell: Mock (or Maybe Real) Job Interviews For New Grads

About to graduate from j-school? Your first job will most likely be the smallest position at a big media outlet or a big one at a small one. Either way, your job interview will contain peculiarities you won't find by Googling, "journalism job interview." Learn how to think like a low-rent hiring editor by sitting across from one. Michael Koretzky has been mired in middle management at a Top 50 newspaper and been EIC of media outlets you've never heard of - which means he's hired new grads most of his life. In front of everyone, do you have the guts to endure a mock (?) interview? Bring your resume to this interactive session or just learn from the carnage you'll witness. Because most new grads suck at job interviews.

Trainer: Michael Koretzky (@koretzky), editor, Debt.com

Click for speaker information
Michael Koretzky (@koretzky), editor, Debt.com
Michael Koretzky was expelled from Boca Raton Academy in 1981, expelled from the University of Florida journalism school in 1989, fired from the South Florida Sun-Sentinel in 1997, and fired from Florida Atlantic University in 2010. His professional highlight, such as it is: freelancing for both The New York Times and the National Enquirer.


Headlines That Work

Learn what your audience is telling you about what headlines work best to connect your content with those who'll find it most relevant. Improve your email open rates, your website engagement and more — without compromising your reputation or journalistic integrity. If you’d like to submit your work for discussion and feedback during the session, email click maps of your email or website’s clickthroughs to charlie@rivetnewsradio.com.

Trainer: Charlie Meyerson, vice president news, Rivet Radio Inc.

Click for speaker information
Charlie Meyerson, vice president news, Rivet Radio Inc.
Charlie Meyerson, vice president of news for Rivet Radio Inc., has devoted a career to connecting great journalism with growing audiences at the intersection of communication and technology — online, on air, in print. He's held managerial roles at the Chicago Tribune, chicagotribune.com, Tribune Co., WGN Radio and WNUA-FM. He's been an award-winning Internet/broadcast reporter at FM News Chicago, WXRT-FM 93.1; and a contributor to Chicago Public Media WBEZ-FM 91.5 and Crain's Chicago Business. He's also been an adjunct professor of journalism at Roosevelt and Northwestern Universities and Columbia College Chicago.


Taking the Leap from News Nerd to Entrepreneur

So, you went to J-School instead of Business School? No problem. Some of today's most successful entrepreneurs have journalism backgrounds. From cool technology, to systems and products that solve today's biggest "new problems", these so-called ''News Nerds'' are proving journalists make great entrepreneurs. Kim Wilson knows firsthand what it’s like to go from the newsroom to the boardroom. Her bootstrapped startup now boasts 600+ newsroom clients and was recently acquired by Graham Media Group. Her story will inspire you, and her advice will give you all the tools you need to take your business idea to the big time.

Trainer: Kim Wilson (@kimsnd), president and founder, SocialNewsDesk

Click for speaker information
Kim Wilson (@kimsnd), president and founder, SocialNewsDesk
Kim Wilson Founded SocialNewsDesk in 2010 after having worked as an Executive Producer in local TV news for about 10 years. She created the SND platform with the needs of a newsroom in mind. Today, more than 600 newsrooms and 15,000 journalists use SocialNewsDesk’s Dashboard, On-Air and Campaigns tools to post, manage, curate and display social media. And her company was recently acquired by Graham Media Group. Kim remains at the helm of the company as CEO and President.


Stories that Matter: Selecting and Designing Stories to Maximize Value and Relevance

Reporters, assignment editors, and news directors often pursue stories based on perceived urgency — a car chase, the mayor's press conference, new employment numbers, etc. The resulting stories are relatively easy to do, but they're often forgettable. They make no lasting impression on the audience or contribution to the community discourse. With a little guidance, advance planning, and surprisingly little additional effort, you can add context and relevance to your stories, making them more significant and valuable to your audience and your community. During this highly interactive seminar, public media veterans will show you how to do this using the Five Tiers of News Coverage, a proven framework for evaluating stories based on significance and relevance. You may even decide to reallocate some of your time and effort to focus on stories that give you and your audience more bang for your reporting buck.

Trainers: Judith Smelser, founder, Smelser Editing & Consulting; Russell Lewis, southern bureau chief, NPR

Click for speaker information
Russell Lewis, southern bureau chief, NPR
Russell Lewis is the Southern Bureau Chief for NPR News, a post he has held since 2006. Lewis focuses on the issues and news central to the Southeast — from Florida to Virginia to Texas, including West Virginia, Kentucky and Oklahoma. In addition to developing and expanding NPR's coverage of the region, Lewis assigns and edits stories from station-based reporters and freelancers alike, working closely with local correspondents and public radio stations. He also spent a year in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, coordinating NPR's coverage of the rebuilding effort. He's currently based in Birmingham, Alabama. Prior to joining NPR, he spent fifteen years working at public radio stations in Florida, Georgia, Kansas and California. He was a frequent contributor to NPR, specializing in military and business issues.

Judith Smelser, founder, Smelser Editing & Consulting
Judith Smelser is the founder of Smelser Editing & Consulting, which provides newsroom consulting, training, and story editing to news organizations around the country. Her current and past clients include: KPBS, KERA, WUNC, WKSU, WMFE, KTOO, West Virginia Public Broadcasting, Colorado Public Radio, Indiana Public Broadcasting Stations (IPBS), and Public Radio News Directors, Inc. (PRNDI). Her training and seminar work include the design and presentation of PRNDI’s News Manager Training and Certification course. She also writes Scribbles and Scruples, a popular blog about media ethics and trends and the craft of journalism.

Smelser has more than a decade of experience as an award-winning editor, newsroom leader, and journalist at public media organizations. As managing editor at Colorado Public Radio and news director at WMFE, Smelser has led coverage of scores of major events, including the Aurora theater shooting and the end of the U.S. space shuttle program. She has worked with NPR to integrate local reporting into national coverage; she has also been part of the most significant public media collaboration projects in recent years, including the Here & Now Contributors Network, NPR's StateImpact initiative, and the Local Journalism Centers project, funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.


Geek Out! Latest Gadgets, Apps & Technology

This now-annual session is where attendees 'get their geek on' by sharing information and asking questions about the latest tech innovations and how they can be used by journalists. What will we talk about this year? Apple Watch? Oculus? Google Cardboard? Come for an informal, engaging, interactive session where we strip out the formality and chat about all the cool stuff going on in journalism — and why it’s such a fun time to work in it. One condition: Come with an open and non-judgmental mind — and with your own topics to discuss.

Trainer: Robert Hernandez (@webjournalist), journalism professor, USC, and co-founder of #WJCHAT

Click for speaker information
Robert Hernandez, journalism professor, USC, and co-founder of #WJCHAT
Robert Hernandez has made a name for himself as a journalist OF the web, not just on the web. His primary focus is exploring and developing the intersection of technology and journalism — to empower people, inform reporting and storytelling, engage community, improve distribution and, whenever possible, enhance revenue. He is an Associate Professor of Professional Practice at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. But he’s not an academic...he’s more of a “hackademic” and specializes in “MacGyvering” web journalism solutions. He connects dots and people. He has worked for seattletimes.com, SFGate.com, eXaminer.com and La Prensa Gráfica, among others. He’s also the co-founder of #wjchat and creator of Learn Code for Journalism with Me project. His most recent work has included Augmented Reality, Wearables/Google Glass and Virtual Reality. He is currently serving on the Online News Association board and is a lifetime member of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.


Making a Media Match: J-Schools and News Outlets

Journalism schools around the country are producing more stories than ever, but don't always have access to high-exposure platforms. Many media organizations are stretched thin and could use help in producing innovative, high-impact stories. Learn how to make a successful media match from faculty at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism, whose award-winning NYCity News Service has spearheaded collaborative projects with outlets of all types and sizes — including The New York Times, NBC News and The New York Daily News. A variety of journalism school decision makers, news professionals and students will talk about the challenges and triumphs that come with working together.

Trainers: Jere Hester, NYCity news service director, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism; Sandeep Junnarkar, interactive journalism program director, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism; Chris Delboni, South Florida News Service director, Florida International University

Click for speaker information
Chris Delboni, South Florida News Service director, Florida International University
Chris Delboni of Florida International University’s South Florida News Service is an award-winning Brazilian journalist who has been a foreign correspondent in the United States since 1993. She started her career as a magazine writer before becoming the Washington correspondent for Bandeirantes Radio Network. She was later hired by CBN Radio, a division of Globo Network giant. Delboni worked most of her tenure in Washington, initially as a general assignment reporter and later as a financial and business correspondent for Globo News TV, Globo Network’s 24-hour news channel. Delboni graduated in print journalism from American University’s School of Communication in 1992 and received a master’s in online journalism from the same institution in 2003. She produced, reported and edited stories daily for a variety of Brazilian mainstream media outlets — from newswire services and magazines to online news sites, radio and television before moving to South Florida, where she began teaching journalism and new media reporting in 2007 at the University of Miami School of Communication and worked with the Knight Center for International Media. In September 2009, she became the first news director for the South Florida News Service at Florida International University. Delboni is now an instructor at FIU and continues to build SFNS. She also has a column online at O Estado de S. Paulo, a major newspaper’s website in Brazil, where she writes about Miami and the Brazilians who chose to call it home.

Jere Hester, NYCity news service director, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism
Jere Hester is Director of the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism’s award-winning NYCity News Service, which produces multimedia special reports and feeds student stories about New York neighborhoods to news organizations around the world. Hester and J-School Interactive Journalism Program Director Sandeep Junnarkar have led collaborations with The New York Times, NBC News and The New York Daily News — most recently “Stop the Mold,” which chronicles the scourge of mold in New York City public housing. Hester was previously City Editor of the Daily News, where he helped run the paper’s award-winning coverage of the 2005 transit strike and the 2003 blackout, among other major stories. Since 2009, he’s written a pop culture column for NBC Local Integrated Media. He is also the author of “Raising a Beatle Baby: How John, Paul, George and Ringo Helped us Come Together as a Family.” Hester received his BA in journalism and politics from New York University in 1988. A lifelong resident of Brooklyn, N.Y., he began his journalism career as an intern at the Downtown Express, where he rose to editor before his 15-year stint as a reporter and editor with the Daily News.

Sandeep Junnarkar, interactive journalism program director, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism
Sandeep Junnarkar is the Director the Interactive Journalism Program Director at CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. He is the former New York bureau chief of CNET News.com, and has specialized in writing about technologies used in different industries. In April 2003, his three-part report on the security risks of online banking was named “Best in Business Projects among Real-Time Publications” by the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. Junnarkar helped to create online editions of The New York Times, working as breaking news editor, writer, and Web producer when the paper went live on the Internet as The New York Times on the Web. Junnarkar is founder and editorial director of www.livesinfocus.org, a multimedia web site that features stories on underreported issues. The site received a New Voices grant for 2008-2010 from J-Lab: The Institute for Interactive Journalism, which is funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. In recent years, Junnarkar has served as a judge for the National Magazine Awards and Online Journalism Awards. He has given talks or led discussions about Social Media and Online Journalism at The Council on Foreign Relations, Columbia University’s Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, and the Online News Association. Junnarkar was president of the South Asian Journalists Association from 2008 to 2010. He received a B.A. in Social Science from the University of California at Berkeley and an M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.


Freelance Foul-Ups: 10 Tips for Pissing Off A Hiring Editor (And 10 Ways to Get Assignments)

What can you learn from an itinerant editor who's worked for media outlets you've never heard of? If you're a freelancer now or want to be one later, you can learn what NOT to do. Michael Koretzky has spent nearly $1 million hiring freelancers for a Top 100 daily, the nation's largest jazz magazine, two alternative weeklies and three national websites. Discover the best techniques for never getting hired — or getting quickly fired. Students: Learn how to freelance while still in school, and how this trumps those stupid unpaid internships.

Trainer: Michael Koretzky (@koretzky), editor, Debt.com

Click for speaker information
Michael Koretzky (@koretzky), editor, Debt.com
Michael Koretzky was expelled from Boca Raton Academy in 1981, expelled from the University of Florida journalism school in 1989, fired from the South Florida Sun-Sentinel in 1997, and fired from Florida Atlantic University in 2010. His professional highlight, such as it is: freelancing for both The New York Times and the National Enquirer.


Future Synergies: Working with High School Programs

Most journalists get their start in high school programs; but in a 2014 national SPJ study, more than 53 percent of high school journalism teachers said they receive zero support from professionals and university journalism educators. Join members of SPJ's Journalism Education Committee, the Journalism Education Association and the Student Press Law Center to learn simple, yet effective, ways of reaching into local classrooms and nurturing a new generation of journalists.

Moderator: Dr. David Burns, associate professor, Salisbury University

Trainers: Dr. Rebecca J. “Becky” Tallent, associate professor, University of Idaho; Frank LoMonte, executive director, Student Press Law Center

Click for speaker information
Dr. David Burns, associate professor, Salisbury University
Dr. David Burns is an associate professor in Salisbury University’s Communication Arts Department where he teaches multimedia journalism courses. Burns has worked for CNN and NBC News, in both permanent and freelance capacities, as a videotape editor and field camera operator in the United States and abroad. While living outside the US, he worked as a technology correspondent for the IDG Wire Service and for a Polish business and finance weekly newspaper. He has taught new media courses to students and professional journalism workshops to media professionals in the United States, Poland, Russia, Jordan, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Afghanistan. Burns is a past president of the Society of Professional Journalists Maryland Professional Chapter. His research interests involve the media-politics linkage. His doctoral dissertation examined the role of the Catholic Church in the development of the Polish media landscape during the transition from communism to capitalism.

Frank LoMonte, executive director, Student Press Law Center
Frank LoMonte joined SPLC in January 2008 after practicing law with Atlanta-based Sutherland LLP and clerking for federal judges on the Northern District of Georgia and the Eleventh Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals. Before law school, LoMonte was an award-winning investigative journalist and political columnist for daily newspapers in Florida and Georgia. LoMonte graduated magna cum laude from the University of Georgia School of Law, where he was a senior editor of the Georgia Law Review. His articles about the First Amendment and media-law topics have been widely published in Education Week, The Chronicle of Higher Education, the American University Law Review, the University of North Carolina First Amendment Law Review, and in many other outlets.

Dr. Rebecca J. “Becky” Tallent, associate professor, University of Idaho
Dr. Rebecca J. “Becky” Tallent is a tenured Associate Professor in the University of Idaho’s School of Journalism and Mass Media. For four years she was chair of the SPJ Journalism Education Committee and shepherded the “Still Captive?” project as coordinator, co-authored several chapters and served as an editor. Becky is an award-winning journalist and public relations specialist who has worked as an energy, environmental and financial journalist, she was also a public relations specialist with state government agencies in science and medicine. In addition to her UI teaching, Becky is a member of both SPJ and the Native American Journalists Association (she is of Cherokee heritage), and she is the advisor to both students groups on campus.


Mobile Journalism and the Future of News (Bilingual Session)

Mobile technology is changing the way news is produced. Now, anyone can be a reporter and participate in the making of news. As a result, news is breaking on social media platforms with all types of media — photos, videos and more — being captured on mobile phones by non-journalists in real time. What impact does live, user-generated content have on stories that come from diverse communities and on getting various viewpoints equal coverage? How does mobile crowdsourced production differ for English-language media versus Spanish-language outlets? How can media organizations ensure that the quality of non-professional work meets professional standards and maintains journalistic ethics? What will the role of journalists be in the future?

This panel will examine why thinking mobile first is essential for journalists today and how media organizations can benefit from promoting collaboration and encouraging community participation in news production. We’ll discuss best practices for mobile reporting in the field and why crowdsourcing from the newsroom and in the community makes sound editorial and business sense. We’ll look at how mobile content creation and distribution is vital in reaching millennials and engaging younger audiences, and explore how mobile-first journalism can provide a new, sustainable business model for journalism.

Moderator: Katie Coronado, journalist and broadcast journalism instructor, University of Central Florida

Speaker: Eric Ortiz, founder/CEO, Evrybit


Be Safe and Savvy: Covering Protests, Unrest and Demonstrations in the U.S.

An everyday protest can turn into a destructive street riot. What do you do when the tone of the story you are covering changes? How do you continue to cover the action when you risk becoming wrapped up in it? Just this past year, we’ve seen multiple times demonstrations turn into much more with reporters caught in the middle. Some reporters are hitting the street with their own security in tow. Learn from those who have been in the middle of it all what you can do to be safe and still get the full story.

Trainers: Eric Rasmussen, Reporter, KTVA Fox2; Collin Wong, Vice President, Star Protection Agency

Click for speaker information
Eric Rasmussen, Reporter, KTVA Fox2
Rasmussen was one of the first reporters on the scene as the city of Oakland erupted in protest over the killing of Oscar Grant by a BART police officer. That was the beginning of nights of street unrest where journalists also became targets of rioters. Since then, Oakland has been a hotbed of violent protests for the Occupy movement, Black Lives Matter, and anti-police demonstrations that Rasmussen has extensively covered. He is a 2006 Edward R. Murrow winner whose career includes stints at WFTV (Orlando), KFSN (Fresno), WCIA (Champaign, IL) and KHSL (Chico).

Collin Wong, Vice President, Star Protection Agency
With over 26 years of experience with the Oakland Police Department, Wong joined Star Protection Agency in 2009. Among many services provided, Star Protection has become a premiere field security force for San Francisco Bay Area news reporters and producers. Wong has spoken at numerous seminars and conferences on a variety of subjects, including organized crime, credit card fraud, organized retail crime, and narcotics. He has extensive contacts in the law enforcement community and has served as a charter member to the Asian Advisory Committee on Crime and the U.S. Secret Service — San Francisco Electronic Crimes Task Force.


Covering the Growing Latino Market

The U.S. Hispanic market, approximately 54 million, is impacting all facets of society from the population and economic growth to politics and popular culture. It is a diverse community which itself is diverse; self-identifying with different races and communicating in different languages. With a purchasing power estimated to be more than 1 trillion, there’s no doubt reaching this key market is crucial to the growth of any organization. In this session, seasoned journalists and researchers discuss the challenges of covering the Latino community and offer insights on ensuring their stories are told and their voices are heard.

Moderator: Hugo Balta (@HugoBalta), senior director of multicultural content, ESPN Digital & Print Media

Speaker: Ramon Escobar (@ramonescobar_), VP, talent recruitment & development, CNN Worldwide

Click for speaker information
Hugo Balta, Senior Director of Multicultural Content, ESPN Digital & Print Media.
Hugo Balta leads initiatives in raising the quality, profile and delivery of diverse news gathering and storytelling. One of the projects he is overseeing is the expansion of ESPN’s One Nacion, a total market initiative focused on best serving U.S. Hispanic sports fans in English y Español across ESPN and ESPN Deportes and all platforms. Before joining the D&I team in December 2014, Hugo was a Coordinating Producer for ESPN’s flagship television program SportsCenter. He is a journalism veteran of more than 20 years having worked in top leadership positions at CBS, Telemundo and NBC before joining ESPN in 2011. Hugo has a passion for serving the Latino community. He’s a lifetime member of NAHJ, as is a former national president. He collaborates with the National Hispanic Media Coalition (NHMC) as guest speaker. He served as chair of the journalism track at this year's Hispanicize conference in South Florida.

Ramon Escobar, VP of talent recruitment and development, CNN
Ramon Escobar is responsible for the recruitment of all on-air talent for CNN U.S., CNN International, CNN en Español and HLN. He also advances the internal development of all anchors, correspondents and contributors. Escobar is based out of New York City and has held his current position since 2012. He came to CNN after several years spent at Telemundo, most recently as executive vice president of network news, overseeing the entire news division including all international news bureaus and the development of on-air talent. While at Telemundo his other roles included senior executive vice president of entertainment and senior vice president of news and creative services. Escobar spent two years as an executive at Sucherman Consulting Group in New York where he acted as vice president and worked with clients including ABC News, Discovery Networks, BBC America and Telemundo. Previously, Escobar served in a management position as vice president at MSNBC in charge of all live news programming. He was also Vice President & News Director of NBC's owned and operated station in Miami, WTVJ and got his start in television as a producer at Univision's owned and operated station in New York, WXTV. In addition to his executive work, Escobar has served as a mentor, teaching several classes as a visiting faculty member at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies. He is a lifetime member of NAHJ.
-->


Unleash Your Inner Broadcaster

In today's media landscape, "broadcasting" isn't just for radio and television people. More and more print journalists and those new to broadcasting are now required to use their voices for podcasts and other online content. However, finding your voice isn't always easy. Learn techniques so you can deliver copy in a clear, conversational manner and more effectively communicate with your audience. We'll have scripts to help you unleash your inner broadcaster. NOTE: While this session is a great way for print journalists to develop stronger vocal ability, it's also an excellent session for radio and television broadcasters to fine-tune their skills and sound better on the air. It is also a great way for newsroom managers to learn new techniques for coaching their own staffs.

Trainers: Amy Tardif, station manager and news director, WGCU-FM and chair, RTDNA; George Bodarky, news and public affairs director, WFUV and president, Public Radio News Directors Inc.

Click for speaker information
George Bodarky, news and public affairs director, WFUV and president, Public Radio News Directors Inc.
George Bodarky is the News and Public Affairs Director at WFUV FM, an NPR affiliate station, based on the Rose Hill campus of Fordham University in the Bronx. George is the current President of Public Radio News Directors, Inc. and a Past President and current board member of the New York State Associated Press Broadcasters Association. He is an award-winning journalist who trains undergraduate and graduate students at Fordham University in multi-platform journalism. George has also taught at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism and CUNY's Graduate School of Journalism. He is widely known for his vocal coaching and journalism training. Over the years his students have won countless awards and have secured employment as anchors, reporters, writers and producers in commercial and public television and radio outlets across the nation. Prior to working at WFUV, George spent many years as an anchor, reporter and news manager in commercial radio and television.

Amy Tardif, station manager and news director, WGCU-FM and chair, RTDNA
Amy Tardif is the Station Manager and News Director for WGCU-FM in Fort Myers, FL. She’s responsible for the sound of the public radio station, is a radio and TV reporter, host and managing editor for the joint licensee. Her audio documentary Lucia’s Letter on human trafficking received a 2010 Peabody Award, an Edward R. Murrow Award, among others.

Tardif the first woman in radio to Chair RTDNA. Prior to becoming Chair she served as the Region 13 Rep on its Board of Directors for which she helped write an e-book on plagiarism and fabrication. She also serves on the Florida Public Broadcasting Service Board of Directors and served 5 years on the PRNDI (Public Radio News Directors Inc) Board.

Prior to joining WGCU Public Media in 1993, Amy was the spokesperson for the Fort Myers Police Department, a reporter/anchor for TV stations in Fort Myers and Austin, Minnesota and reporter for WUSF Public Radio in Tampa.


Why You're Doing Audio Levels Wrong and Why it Really Does Matter

Have you ever been watching a video or listening to a radio story and had to adjust your volume controls to understand what people are saying? It's a lot harder than you might realize to produce audio with consistent loudness. Thanks to a quirk of human perception, what you see is not what you get in your editing software. Come learn about the ''Fletcher-Munson Curve'' and how understanding it can help you produce media that's easier to hear and understand.

Trainer: Adam Ragusea, journalist in residence and visiting assistant professor, Mercer University Center for Collaborative Journalism

Click for speaker information
Adam Ragusea, journalist in residence and visiting assistant professor, Mercer University Center for Collaborative Journalism
Adam Ragusea is a journalist in residence and visiting assistant professor at Mercer University's Center for Collaborative Journalism in Macon, Georgia, which unites an undergraduate journalism program, a daily commercial newspaper and a public broadcaster in a "teaching hospital model" of journalism education and practice.

Ragusea hosts and produces the weekly podcast "The Pub" for the public broadcasting trade publication Current, which features his commentaries and interviews on issues affecting public and non-profit media. He frequently reports on a range of issues for NPR, Slate and other national outlets.

A musician by training, Ragusea studied classical composition at the Eastman School of Music, Penn State and Indiana University. His career in media began at NPR station WFIU in Bloomington, Indiana. He's since worked as a reporter, producer and host at WBUR in Boston and Georgia Public Broadcasting.


Who Delivers the Message is as Important as the Message

It might be a new media, but it's challenged with old problems. Despite being the vehicle of choice for millennials led by Hispanics, the number of multicultural voices remains worrisomely low. Panelists will discuss the lack of diversity and how it negatively impacts content development. The workshop also offers simple solutions for improving the fair and accurate coverage of minorities.

Moderator: Hugo Balta, senior director multicultural content, ESPN

Speakers: Tracie Powell, founder, All Digitocracy; Ernesto Mourelo, director of digital content, Hearst Television; Alison Overholt, editor in chief, espnW

Click for speaker information
Hugo Balta, senior director multicultural content, ESPN
Hugo Balta is the Senior Director of Multicultural Content, ESPN Digital & Print Media.

Hugo leads initiatives in raising the quality, profile and delivery of diverse news gathering and storytelling.

He's overseeing the expansion of ESPN One Nacion, an initiative focused on best serving U.S. Hispanic sports fans in English y español across ESPN and ESPN Deportes networks and all platforms.

Hugo is a diversity and inclusion media specialist, often asked to be a guest speaker and writer
He is the immediate past president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) having served from 2012-2014. Before that he served in various leadership roles nationally and locally for NAHJ.

He is a journalism veteran of more than 20 years having worked at CBS, Telemundo and NBC before joining ESPN.

Ernesto Mourelo, director of digital content, Hearst Television
Ernesto Mourelo is the Director of Digital Content at Hearst Television.

Ernesto is a journalist with more than 17 years of experience working in television and digital media for both English and Spanish-language broadcast companies.

He started his career as a video editor and producer before moving into management roles for NBC/Telemundo in San Diego and Los Angeles. From there, Ernesto joined Hearst Television in Cincinnati before becoming the company’s Director of Digital Content in New York, where he leads the editorial operations for Hearst TV’s web and mobile platforms and content syndication efforts.

Ernesto is a member of the National Lesbian and Gay Journalism Association.

Alison Overholt, editor in chief, espnW
Alison Overholt is the editor-in-chief of espnW.

Alison is responsible for developing comprehensive content strategies through digital, mobile, social, print and video.

Previously, she developed content strategies and editorial mission and direction as part of her own business, 183Ink, LLC, for Hearst Publishing and Seventeen Magazine, The Breast Cancer Research Foundation and NASDAQ OMX, among others.

Alison has also served as a contributor to Fast Company, Fortune, O: The Oprah Magazine, Cosmo and The Wall Street Journal.

She has also served as an adjunct professor at New York University’s Preston Robert Tisch Center for Hospitality, Tourism and Sports Management since 2012.

Tracie Powell, founder, All Digitocracy
Tracie Powell is the founder, editor and publisher of All Digitocracy a go-to source for information about all things digital and media, particularly as it relates to diverse consumers and communities. 


Tracie specializes in researching, analyzing and communicating opportunities and challenges facing the media and technology sector. Her specialties include writing, editing, new media, politics and policy, interpersonal and leadership skills, public speaking, journalism, persuasive writing, media relations and crisis communications.

She is the co-chair of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Digital Journalism Task Force.

Tracie contributes regularly to the Columbia Journalism Review writing about media, media policy specifically on issues regarding diversity, piracy, media ownership, government transparency and the business of journalism.


Follow the Money

Ever since Watergate, reporters have followed the money. In this electronic age, FollowTheMoney.org, opensecrets.org and a range of other non-profit, non-partisan groups are making it easier than ever in the digital age to discover who is trying to influence policy makers. What candidates or states are the private prison industry targeting; are those states getting “tough on crime” to fill the private prison beds? Where are the gas and oil industries investing? How do you track corporate subsidies across the nation? Where’s the best online source to learn about Political Action Committees? Get a quick tour of some online tools and learn how on any beat money in politics relates to your coverage. And remember, it's not just about the money during elections — it's about what happens afterward, when the winners are in office.

Trainers: Edwin Bender, executive director, National Institute on Money in State Politics; James McNair, investigative reporter, Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting

Click for speaker information
Edwin Bender, executive director, National Institute on Money in State Politics
Edwin Bender is a founding incorporator for the Institute and has been the executive director for more than a decade. Ed promotes the use of the Institute's comprehensive, highly credentialed state-level donor information by investigative journalists, scholars examining state elections and public-policy processes, and attorneys involved in campaign-finance litigation.

James McNair, investigative reporter, Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting
James McNair has spent nearly 30 years in journalism, having worked as a staff reporter for the Miami Herald, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and the Cincinnati Enquirer. His reporting has unearthed fraudulent schemes and dubious business practices. He has won journalism awards in five states, and his latest gig is with the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting.


15 Jaw-Droppingly Cool Online Tools You Will LOVE and USE

Come find out how easy it is to build a 360 interactive photo, drop interactive tags on your online photos or use metadata and search tools to find, enrich and verify stories. See how Twitter and Facebook can be a powerful search engine. See one big tool that hackers use that may just keep you up at night. This high energy interactive romp will make you say WOW!

Trainer: Al Tompkins, senior faculty for broadcasting and online, The Poynter Institute

Click for speaker information
Al Tompkins, senior faculty for broadcasting and online, The Poynter Institute
Al Tompkins is The Poynter Institute’s senior faculty for broadcasting and online. For almost 10 years, thousands of people a day read his online journalism story idea column “Al’s Morning Meeting” on Poynter.org.

Tompkins is the author of the book “Aim For The Heart: A Guide for TV Producers and Reporters,” which was adopted by more than 75 universities as their main broadcast writing textbook.

He co-authored four editions of the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation’s “Newsroom Ethics” workbook. Tompkins joined Poynter’s faculty from his job as news director at WSMV-TV in Nashville, Tenn. For 24 years, he worked as a photojournalist, reporter, producer, anchor, assistant news director, special projects/investigations director, documentary producer and news director.

Tompkins has trained thousands of television news producers, reporters, photojournalists and managers in his One-Day Storytelling Workshops in 45 states, Canada, Denmark, Iceland and South Africa. He has taught and coached print newsrooms in the U.S. and abroad how to build interactive news websites, how to use video more effectively online and how to manage ethical issues that arise online.

Awards: Tompkins was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame and in 2008 was awarded The Governor’s Award, the highest honor given by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. During his two and a half decades as a journalist, Tompkins has won the National Emmy, the Peabody Award (group award), the Japan Prize, the American Bar Association’s Silver Gavel for Court Reporting, seven National Headliner Awards, two Iris Awards and the Robert F. Kennedy Award.

He is a co-producer of the hour-long documentary, “Saving Stefani,” featured as a special “Dateline NBC” and was awarded the 1999 Clarion Award. The 10-year documentary project tells the story of a young girl that Tompkins and a medical team found dying in a Guatemala hospital.

Tompkins also serves as a final juror on the duPont-Columbia Awards, the Scripps Howard National Journalism Awards and is a national screener for the Investigative Reporter and Editor awards.


Crisis Reporting: gaining access to subject matter experts, and the questions to ask when you get it

In this two-part presentation, Carolyn Carlson begins by sharing results of her research and a survey of science writers from throughout the United States jointly sponsored by the Union of Concerned Scientist and SPJ. The survey sought to identify and quantify the ability of science writers to access subject matter experts employed by government in the course of their reporting, with particular emphasis on the role of the various agencies' public information offices in facilitating that access. In the second part of the presentation, Marcus Deyerin, an incident management team PIO and emergency manager, will describe the challenges of meeting public information and media needs during the early hours and days of a crisis incident, and how understanding the "crisis arc" and other key incident management concepts can render journalists more effective in reporting on these stories.

Trainers: Carolyn Carlson, Ph.D., associate professor, Kennesaw State University; Marcus Deyerin, public information officer, Northwest Washington Incident Management Team

Click for speaker information
Carolyn Carlson, Ph.D., associate professor, Kennesaw State University
Dr. Carolyn S. Carlson is an associate professor of communication in the journalism and emerging media concentration at Kennesaw State University in suburban Atlanta, where she teaches the reporting and writing classes. Her main area of research focuses on the relationship between government public information officers and reporters, particularly the role that PIOs play in the interviewing and reporting process. She and her research, conducted on behalf of the SPJ Freedom of Information Committee, has been the subject of many news stories published by the New York Times, Washington Post and others. She is a member of the FOI Committee, adviser to the KSU SPJ chapter and a past national president of SPJ.

Marcus Deyerin, public information officer, Northwest Washington Incident Management Team
Marcus Deyerin is an emergency manager, trainer and speaker. He serves in several different positions on incident management teams at the local, state and federal level; regularly provides incident command system and information operations training to a variety of audiences; and frequently presents on topics that include technology, team building, community resilience strategies, and future casting of emerging challenges and opportunities in the emergency management field. Marcus was a National Security Studies Program scholar at The George Washington University, and earned a MA in National Security Policy from Georgetown University. When he isn’t doing disaster stuff, you’ll find him doing outdoorsy stuff with his wife and three boys.


New Economic Data You Can Use in 2015 and Beyond

Program participants will learn how create original reporting on earnings, spending and investments using new economic data being released in 2015 by the Bureau of Economic Analysis — the U.S. Government's leading economic statistical agency — on health care, state economic activity, consumer spending at the state level, spending and employment in the arts and culture and international investments. Participants will also learn how to use these new data sets to better cover existing economic events.

Trainers: Jeannine Aversa, chief of public affairs and outreach, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis; Thomas Dail, public affairs specialist, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

Click for speaker information
Jeannine Aversa, chief of public affairs and outreach, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
Jeannine Aversa is chief of public affairs and outreach at the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. Before joining BEA in the fall of 2011, Aversa was a journalist for nearly 30 years and reported for The Associated Press, Bloomberg News, Fairchild Publications and other news organizations. For more than a decade, Aversa’s coverage focused on economics, monetary policy, finance and politics. She holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri at Columbia.

Thomas Dail, public affairs specialist, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
Thomas Dail is a public affairs specialist at the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. He brings a dozen years of experience in newspapers and public relations to that job. Prior to joining the BEA, he covered politics and business for Freedom Communications in North Carolina. Dail holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an MBA from the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland.


To Comment or Not to Comment

One of the most interesting topics in the journalism industry today is the discussion over what to do about comment sections. Almost every news site has one, but many still have questions about how to handle them. How do we keep them civil? Should we moderate them? Push the conversation over to social media? Prohibit comments on certain stories? Hear how some journalists wrangle online discussion around their content and use it to build audience and community, as well as why some news organizations have chosen to end commenting completely. We also will share research-based techniques for improving comment sections.

Trainers: Marie K. Shanahan, assistant journalism professor, University of Connecticut; Natalie Jomini Stroud, associate professor of communication studies, University of Texas at Austin and director, Engaging News Project

Click for speaker information
Marie K. Shanahan, assistant journalism professor, University of Connecticut
Marie K. Shanahan is an assistant professor of journalism at the University of Connecticut. She spent 17 years as a reporter and online news editor before joining the faculty at UConn's nationally accredited journalism program. She teaches digital newsgathering techniques, various forms of multimedia storytelling and online ethics. Her academic research explores online commenting, anonymous online speech, digital defamation and online reputation. Admittedly, she spends way too much time on social media.

Natalie Jomini Stroud, associate professor of communication studies, University of Texas at Austin and director, Engaging News Project
Natalie Jomini Stroud is an Associate Professor of Communication Studies and Assistant Director of Research at the Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Life at the University of Texas at Austin. Since 2012, Stroud has directed the grant-funded Engaging News Project, which examines commercially-viable and democratically-beneficial ways of improving online news coverage. In 2014-15, she is a fellow at the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics at Princeton University. Stroud is interested in how the media affect our political behaviors and attitudes and how our political behaviors and attitudes affect our media use. Her book, Niche News: The Politics of News Choice (Oxford University Press) explores the causes, consequences, and prevalence of partisan selective exposure, the preference for like-minded political information. Niche News received the International Communication Association's Outstanding Book Award. Her research has appeared in Political Communication, Journal of Communication, Political Behavior, Public Opinion Quarterly, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, and the International Journal of Public Opinion Research. She teaches courses in public opinion, media effects and politics, and quantitative research methods. Stroud twice received the Outstanding Faculty Member Award from the Communication Studies Graduate Community and was invited to the Society for Teaching Excellence at the University of Texas.


TV News Survival Skills

You can't afford to get your big break and THEN learn these lessons! This session will give you the tools to pitch the lead story every day, get noticed in your current market and gain the attention of news directors and managers in Top 10 TV markets. Learn what works and what doesn't from a reporter and manager perspective. Hear from an on-air reporter in New York and former news director of a CBS and Telemundo station as they dish advice and secrets on how to propel your career without breaking a sweat.

Trainers: Stephanie Tsoflias Siegel, reporter, New 12 Long Island and founder, Reel Reporting; Greg Turchetta, executive director of communications and community engagement, Collier County Public Schools

Click for speaker information
Stephanie Tsoflias Siegel, reporter, New 12 Long Island and founder, Reel Reporting
Stephanie spends her days in the field covering compelling reports for News 12 Long Island. Previously, she reported for PIX 11 News — uncovering stories in the nation’s biggest media market, New York. "Steph" got her first job as an intern in Atlantic City, but her on-air career began in Gainesville, Florida. At just 23, Stephanie was selected as one of twelve journalists in the state of Florida to witness the execution of the "Gainesville Killer," Danny Rolling. Moving to Ft. Myers, Florida, a few years later, during President Barack Obama’s first run for president, Stephanie landed a one-on-one exclusive interview with then Vice Presidential candidate Joe Biden. They discussed the foreclosure crisis and life on the campaign trial. This helped Steph land a job in the number one market!

In her rapidly growing career, she has also covered such recent major news events as Hurricanes Sandy, for which Stephanie won an Emmy Award. She was also there to cover the Newtown, Connecticut massacre. Combining on-air reporting and teaching, Stephanie is regular instructor at Media Bistro. She maintains a personal blog that has been featured in the Huffington Post, The Knot and MSN and been a guest speaker at Syracuse University as well as University of Maryland. She has completed three NYC ING Marathons!

Stephanie founded Reel Reporting in 2013. It is Stephanie’s way to pass on the knowledge and expertise she has in her professional career, while also fulfilling her passion to teach aspiring on-air journalists.

Greg Turchetta, executive director of communications and community engagement, Collier County Public Schools
A brutally honest and opinionated news coach and manager, Greg Turchetta spent more than a decade in newsrooms at every level. First a photographer, than a news manager and eventually a News Director of a duopoly, Greg has upped the quality of Reel Reporting’s reels and workshops by providing our students and clients with career coaching; giving them the tools to identify their strengths and land the right jobs. Greg served as News Director for the CBS and Telemundo stations in Austin, Texas. During his time, he hired 50 people including Spanish speaking and Bi-Lingual reporters and anchors. Greg’s station served as the news hub for all Sinclair owned Texas Stations. Before his time in Austin, Greg worked for some of the most dominant TV stations in America.

Currently, Greg serves as the Executive Director of Communications and Community Engagement for Collier County Public Schools. He serves as the district spokesperson and communication liaison between 45,000 students, parents and 7,500 employees.


Producing Producers

If you're a news director or newsroom manager who hires young producers, this is the session for you. This session will give tips and a template to use in your newsroom to help train and groom promising young producers.

Trainers: Jeimmie Nevalga, assistant professor and executive producer, Missouri School of Journalism & KOMU-TV; Randy Reeves, associate professor and news director, Missouri School of Journalism & KOMU-TV

Click for speaker information
Jeimmie Nevalga, assistant professor and executive producer, Missouri School of Journalism & KOMU-TV
Jeimmie Nevalga is an assistant professor with the Missouri School of Journalism and the executive producer for the KOMU-TV. Nevalga has spent the last four years teaching the next generation of producers and reporters. Before returning to her alma mater she spent more than 10 years producing traditional and non-traditional newscasts. Her career began at WISN 12, the ABC affiliate in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as a morning and 6pm producer. In 2005 she made the jump to Chicago, her hometown, where she worked as a producer and executive producer for CLTV, a 24-hour local cable news station. In 2009, she was instrumental in the merger of CLTV with its sister station WGN, where she served as senior producer.

Randy Reeves, associate professor and news director, Missouri School of Journalism & KOMU-TV
Randy Reeves spent seven years producing television newscasts for KSBW-TV in Salinas, California, and WOOD-TV in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He also spent nine years as a small-market radio news and sports director at WYMC-TV in Mayfield, Kentucky. In 2003, he joined Missouri School of Journalism faculty as an assistant professor teaching broadcast reporting classes and serving as news director at KOMU-TV. Randy earned his master of arts degree at the University of Missouri. He earned a bachelor of science degree from Murray State University.


ID Laws: Why Isn't Voting Easy and Convenient in the 21st Century?

A panel that consists of a journalist, representative of the League of Women Voters and an elections administrator will discuss the impact of state laws requiring government identification and other requirements to vote. Proponents feel increasing requirements for identification prevents voter impersonation and increases public confidence in the election process. Others feel the right to vote is becoming restrictive and burdenson. Panel will provide sources and tips for keeping on top of a topic that’s a moving target.

Moderator: Sandra Gonzalez, reporter, KSNV-TV

Speakers: April Bethea, online producer, The Charlotte Observer; Bill Cowles, supervisor of election, Orange County, Florida

Click for speaker information
Sandra Gonzalez, reporter, KSNV-TV
Sandra Gonzalez is a general assignment reporter for KSNV-TV in Las Vegas, Nevada. Gonzalez has been reporting news for more than two decades in both TV and radio. She is a member of the SPJ Diversity Committee and served as chairman 2012-2014, Secretary for SPJ Las Vegas. Gonzalez is also active in the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.

April Bethea, online producer, The Charlotte Observer
April Bethea is an online producer at The Charlotte Observer where she helps curate the newsroom's annual voter guide, among other duties. She previously was a reporter for more than eight years at the Observer, and has been involved with elections coverage there in some capacity since 2005. Bethea also chairs the SPJ Diversity Committee and is vice president of the Greater Charlotte chapter of SPJ. She's also a member of the National Association of Black Journalists and has served as a chapter officer in Charlotte and in college.

Bill Cowles, supervisor of election, Orange County, Florida
Bill Cowles has been an integral part of the Orange County Supervisor of Elections office since 1989. He was elected as the Orange County Supervisor of Elections in 1996, and re-elected in 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012. Bill supervises the fifth largest county elections office in the State of Florida. Bill served on the Federal Elections Assistance Commission Board of Advisors from 2007 to 2011. His other professional involvement includes being Past President of the Florida State Association of Supervisors of Elections, as well as Past President of the International Association of Clerks, Recorders, Election Officials, and Treasurers.


News Truck in Your Hand

The best camera you have is the one that is with you. In this session, you will learn how to stream video live with your smartphone, how to shoot and edit video using a variety of applications and social media networks. You will also learn best practices and leadership tips so you can share with your colleagues.

Trainer: Mo Krochmal, editor and founder, Social Media News NY

Click for speaker information
Mo Krochmal, editor and founder, Social Media News NY
Mo Krochmal is editor and founder of Social Media News NY, a New York-based strategic consultancy focusing on social media, mobile media and content. He is a frequent speaker and a guest lecturer at Columbia Teachers College and Baruch College as well as teaching at Gotham Writers Workshop. Clients include CBS News, CNBC, C-SPAN, Ogilvy, Columbia du-Pont Journalism Awards, New York Press Club, Social Media Holdings, National Association of Hispanic Journalists and MIT Enterprise Forum NYC.

This is his third year working with Roni Weiss and #NYTravFest.

He was Hofstra's first digital journalism professor and has served on the adjunct faculty at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.


The Most Latino Election Ever

From Hispanic candidates to Hispanic voters to Hispanic issues, this panel will examine how the nation’s changing demographics are changing national politics. In this bipartisan session, representatives from both sides and media members will discuss the role Latinos will play in shaping the 2016 elections — national and local. What are candidates doing to try to win the Latino vote? What election issues are of most interest to Hispanic voters? How and where are Latinos getting the news and information that will shape their decisions? This session will tackle these topics and more.



– ADVERTISEMENT –

Home
Registration rates
Schedule at a glance
Conference highlights
Breakout sessions
Pre-conference workshops
Journalism Expo
Hotel/travel details
Welcome to Orlando
Help/Contacts

  EIJ on Facebook
  #EIJ15

Info for SPJ Leaders

EIJ14 recap
Future EIJ locations


Help/Contact  •   Future EIJ locations
Info for SPJ Leaders