Breakout Sessions and Workshops

There's something for everyone in this year's schedule. Check out a growing list of the breakout sessions we're offering in Baltimore! All sessions are included as part of your conference registration — no additional fees apply.

Lots more sessions, as well as speaker bios, will be added shortly, so check back in soon!


Jump to:
News Management
Newsgathering
Digital
Career Development
Sponsored Sessions

Jump to:
Thursday: 9 a.m. | 10:30 a.m. | 1 p.m. | 2:30 p.m.
Friday: 9 a.m. | 10:30 a.m. | 1:30 p.m. | 3 p.m.
Saturday: 9 a.m. | 10:30 a.m. | 1:30 p.m. | 3 p.m.


News Management

Are you a newsroom leader? Sessions in our News Management track will help you become a better one. This track focuses on high-level decision-making and the issues and problems facing many leaders in the journalism industry.

Additional training opportunities: Deep-Dive Workshops at EIJ18

Aside from dozens of breakout sessions, EIJ18 offers additional training opportunities with in-depth, hands-on, skills-based workshops. These longer and more intensive programs are yet another way you can improve your journalism skills at EIJ18.

ACES’ Editing Boot Camp

Telling Local Climate Change Stories that Matter: Science, Impacts, and Solutions

Watchdog Journalism for Digital Storytelling

Google News Initiative: Fundamental Tools for Covering Elections and Beyond

It’s Just Video, Until a Storyteller Creates an Experience

Data on a Deadline: Dive into Census Bureau Data to Deliver Compelling Stories

Mobile and Data Viz Reporting Tools Training

Mobile Journalism: Story Creation in Your Pocket

Please note: Limited space available. Advance registration required unless otherwise marked. You must register for the full EIJ18 conference in order to attend a free workshop. Visit the workshops page for all the pertinent details.


Legal Workshops: Trump and the First Amendment, Libel/Privacy, and Copyright

Saturday, Sept. 29, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free to attend. Attendees are welcome to attend any or all of these sessions and no pre-registration required. Get all the details here.

Media Law in the age of Trump: Are First Amendment Freedoms in Danger?
Legal Workshop on Content: Libel and Invasion of Privacy
Legal Workshop: Copyright and Digital Media

Critical Thinking to Fight Fake News

Thursday, Sept. 27, 1-2 p.m.

The Poynter Institute’s Al Tompkins will use real case studies to show how journalists can get faked out by fake news. Worse, you need to know how trolls and fakers do their work to create believable posts. You will see how, in just seconds, fakers can create realistic tweets, headlines and rumors. You will learn the four key questions to ask to inoculate you against fake news. This will be a high-energy, interactive and practical session that you will put into action on your next shift.

Speaker: Al Tompkins, senior faculty for broadcasting and online, The Poynter Institute

Click for speaker information


Al Tompkins, senior faculty for broadcasting and online, The Poynter Institute
Al Tompkins is The Poynter Institute’s senior faculty for broadcasting and online. For almost 10 years, thousands of people a day read his online journalism story idea column “Al’s Morning Meeting” on Poynter.org.

Tompkins is the author of the book “Aim For The Heart: A Guide for TV Producers and Reporters,” which was adopted by more than 75 universities as their main broadcast writing textbook.

He co-authored four editions of the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation’s “Newsroom Ethics” workbook. Tompkins joined Poynter’s faculty from his job as news director at WSMV-TV in Nashville, Tenn. For 24 years, he worked as a photojournalist, reporter, producer, anchor, assistant news director, special projects/investigations director, documentary producer and news director.

Tompkins has trained thousands of television news producers, reporters, photojournalists and managers in his One-Day Storytelling Workshops in 45 states, Canada, Denmark, Iceland and South Africa. He has taught and coached print newsrooms in the U.S. and abroad how to build interactive news websites, how to use video more effectively online and how to manage ethical issues that arise online.


Seven Steps to Get to Know Your Audience

Thursday, Sept. 27, 1-2 p.m.

How do you make sure citizens are both informed and heard? We’ll share techniques developed by the Listening Post Collective, a media engagement project of Internews that helps local outlets around the world create conversation around local news. Participants will learn creative offline strategies for community engagement such as public art, SMS, public events, and more, focused on 'news you can use' topics like housing, education, jobs, and health. Participants will get a 7-step plan for implementing a media engagement strategy in their home community.

Speakers: Carolyn Powers, senior program officer, Internews

Click for speaker information


Carolyn Powers, senior program officer, Internews
Carolyn Powers is the Senior Program Officer coordinating US programs at Internews, which includes the Listening Post Collective (LPC) a community news initiative that supports listening and engaged journalism projects around the US. Partnering with media and community groups in places as diverse as New Orleans and New Jersey, Omaha and Oakland, Carolyn has experience designing programs with and mentoring independent journalists, small news outlets and local organizations interested in listening to their diverse communities, building trust, and creating more relevant, inclusive media. Carolyn has presented on the LPC's methodology and playbook at various conferences across the country and helps to promote listening and engaged journalism strategies in Internews' programs globally. Outside of Internews, Carolyn has led storytelling courses with college students in Kigali, Rwanda, served as a community organizer in the Boston area, skis whenever she can get north to some snow, and now considers herself a novice rock climber.


No More Assholes Part 2: The coward's guide to conflict in the newsroom

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2:30-3:30 p.m.

Following up on 2016's popular "No More Assholes in the Newsroom," Kevin Benz presents a conversation about how newsroom culture goes bad and what every journalist can do to create a more hospitable even happier workplace and defend yourself against negativity, harassment and bullies (even if your boss is the asshole). Presented by The Kneeland Project for Responsible Journalism.

Speaker: Kevin Benz, former news director, media strategist and consultant, i-Media Strategies

Click for speaker information


Kevin Benz, former news director, media strategist and consultant, i-Media Strategies
A former Chairman of the RTDNA, Kevin Benz today is known as a thoughtful journalism coach and trainer — his 30 years in broadcast journalism and entrepreneurial media provide an understanding of what journalists and newsrooms need to build better cultures and community trust. Staring as news videographer, he worked his way to News Director and in 1999 launched News 8 Austin, Time Warner Cable’s 24-hour Newschannel and spent over 11 years there as News Director.

Under his guidance the newsroom received national recognition from the most prestigious organizations including two Sigma Delta Chi awards, the National Edward R. Murrow award, three National Walter Cronkite awards for excellence in Political Journalism and finalist for the DuPont-Columbia Award. Today he runs i-Media Strategies, a journalism training and media coaching organization.


Unity: Successes, Challenges & What's Next

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2:30-3:30 p.m.

It was the grandest of ideas: Formally unite the four minority media associations in solidarity. It was bold. And every five years when the organizations would come together for a joint convention, it was impressive. So what happened? Twenty-eight years after its birth, the organization closed its doors in February 2018 after bickering over finances and a whole lot more. We talk to the players.

Speakers: Paul Delaney, former New York Times editor and founding member, the National Association of Black Journalists; Dewayne Wickham, NABJ; Richard Prince, columnist, journal-isms.com; Alison Bethel McKenzie, executive director, Society of Professional Journalists; Sarah Blazucki, treasurer, Unity: Journalists for Diversity

Click for speaker information


Richard Prince, columnist, journal-isms.com
Richard Prince is a long-time columnist of "Journal-isms," formerly for the Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education, now on its own site, journal- isms.com. Prince, who worked for the Washington Post, has won multiple awards during his career and is known for coverage about diversity in journalism.



Paul Delaney, former New York Times editor and founding member, the National Association of Black Journalists
Paul Delaney, veteran print journalist, spent 23 years with the New York Times as an editor and correspondent. Delaney was a founding member of two organizations, the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) and the National Association of Minority Media Executives. Delaney is currently living in Washington and completing a memoir on his career.

Alison Bethel McKenzie, executive director, Society of Professional Journalists
Alison is a veteran journalist with over 30 years of experience as an award-winning reporter, bureau chief, senior editor and media trainer. She also has a decade of experience as a non-profit leader. She has worked in senior-level positions at The Boston Globe, the Detroit News, Legal Times and the Nassau Guardian in The Bahamas as managing director. She has also worked at The Miami Herald, The Los Angeles Times, Poughkeepsie Journal and the now-defunct State Times in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Alison spent a year in Accra, Ghana (2008-2009), for the Washington, D.C.-based International Center for Journalists, as a Knight International Journalism Fellow, helping Ghanaian journalists improve their reporting skills in the run-up to the 2008 presidential election; and a year in Bangalore, India (2016-2017) as a visiting professor of print and investigative journalism. From 2009-2015, she served as the executive director of the International Press Institute in Vienna, Austria. Alison is a co-founder and former vice president of the board of directors for Media Institute of the Caribbean. She is a former board member of AlJazeera America (NY) and a member and former board member of the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Her hometown is Miami, Florida.

Sarah Blazucki, Treasurer, Unity: Journalists for Diversity
Sarah Blazucki is the communications coordinator for a federal agency in Washington, D.C., where manages and edits publications, web content, responses to information requests, marketing and social media. Prior to her current position, Blazucki was the agency editor at the Peace Corps. There, she supported external communications across publications, marketing, public affairs and congressional relations. Previously, Blazucki was the editor of the Philadelphia Gay News, where she led staff to win more than 20 awards. She also has more than 15 years’ experience as a freelance résumé writer. In addition, Blazucki has edited a range of print and online publications, including books, magazines, newspapers, reports, press releases, web and social media content and marketing materials. She serves on several boards, including NLGJA: The Association of LGBTQ Journalists, Unity: Journalists for Diversity and Youth Pride Alliance. Blazucki received her B.A. in mass communications, with a minor in women’s studies from Towson State University.


Gaining back trust in the era of Trump

Friday, Sept. 28, 9:15-10:15 a.m.

When anything can be labeled "fake news," just doing good journalism isn't enough to earn the public's trust. News organizations need to do more to retain and rebuild their credibility. We'll share strategies that work for newsrooms and individual journalists.

Speakers: Lynn Walsh, project manager, Trusting News Project; Deborah Potter, founder, NewsLab.org; Chip Mahaney, news director, WCPO-TV Cincinnati; Elizabeth Jensen, Ombudsman/Public Editor, NPR; John Dunbar, CEO, Center for Public Integrity

Click for speaker information


Lynn Walsh, project manager, Trusting News Project
Lynn Walsh (@LWalsh) is an Emmy award-winning journalist who has worked in investigative, data and TV journalism at the national level as well as locally in California, Ohio, Texas and Florida. Currently, she is the Project Manager for the Trusting News project, where she works to help rebuild trust between journalists and the public by working with newsrooms to be more transparent about how they do their jobs. She is a digital explorer and an international speaker and trainer, working to encourage transparency, media engagement, digital innovation and free expression rights for all.

Deborah Potter, founder, NewsLab.org
Deborah is a veteran journalist and trainer who founded NewsLab.org, which is now affiliated with the University of Mississippi. She is a former network correspondent who spent 16 years at CBS and CNN. This spring, Deborah taught a seminar on journalism and trust at the University of Montana and launched TrustingJournalism.com as a resource for newsrooms and journalism educators. Deborah leads workshops for journalists around the world and is co- author of "Advancing the Story: Quality Journalism in a Digital World," now in its fourth edition.

Chip Mahaney, news director, WCPO-TV Cincinnati
Chip Mahaney has nearly 40 years experience in news, primarily in television and digital, with 20 of those years in leadership positions at local and corporate levels. Chip is currently News Director at Scripps-flagship WCPO in Cincinnati. He has worked 10 years for Scripps, with most of that time in various digital roles at the company’s headquarters. Before coming to Scripps in 2008, Chip worked for local media organizations in the Fox, Raycom, Gannett and Belo groups.

Chip serves the journalism industry as a member of the RTDNA board of directors. He is a longtime judge of the annual Edward R. Murrow Awards. Chip has mentored dozens of developing journalists over the years, and he currently serves as a professional adviser to Ohio University's E.W. Scripps School of Journalism.

Elizabeth Jensen, Ombudsman/Public Editor, NPR
Elizabeth Jensen (@ejensenNYC) serves as the public's representative to NPR, responding to listener questions and criticisms. She has spent decades taking an objective look at the media industry. As a contributor to The New York Times, she covered public broadcasting, wrote for the Columbia Journalism Review and was a regular contributor to Current, the public broadcasting trade publication. Jensen reported on the media for The Los Angeles Times, was a senior writer for Brill's Content, and spent six years at The Wall Street Journal, where she was part of a team of reporters honored with a Sigma Delta Chi public service award.

John Dunbar, CEO, Center for Public Integrity
John Dunbar (@JohnDunbar14) is the creator of "Consider the Source," the Center's ongoing investigation of the impact of money on state and federal politics. He has led several Center projects including the "Who's Behind the Financial Meltdown" investigation into the subprime lending industry and the follow-up to that project, "After the Meltdown," which won a George Polk Award. He also reported on media and technology issues and the financial meltdown for the Washington bureau of the Associated Press. Prior to his work with the Center, Dunbar was chief investigative reporter with the Florida Times-Union in Jacksonville.


Better your bottom line with metrics

Friday, Sept. 28, 9:15-10:15 a.m.

As the industry continues to struggle with advertising declines, especially in print, the need for publishers to explore and implement other business models is critical for long-term growth and sustainability. Now more than ever, newsrooms and business departments are coming together to work collaboratively to better serve the needs of their shared audiences. In this session we will share examples of how media organizations are using research and metrics to improve their bottom line and more effectively engage their readers.

Speakers: Gwen Vargo, director of reader revenue, American Press Institute; Liz Worthington, director of content strategy, American Press Institute

Click for speaker information


Gwen Vargo, director of reader revenue, American Press Institute
Gwen Vargo is Director of Reader Revenue for American Press Institute, where she works to support and accelerate the growth of subscriptions and user revenue at U.S. news organizations. She works directly with API’s partner news organizations to understand the path audiences take to subscription; gathers and spreads best practices; leads research efforts; and helps API’s partners develop innovative approaches to generating subscriptions through understanding audience data, marketing, communication, and content. Prior to API, Gwen was at The Chronicle of Higher Education and led cross functional team that included marketing, sales, circulation and market research and worked to develop sustainable revenue models for an array of digital products, including webinars, customized data, and events. While at Atlantic Media Company, Gwen oversaw marketing, sales, and client services for National Journal Group and previously managed marketing and operations efforts at Euromoney Institutional Investor, PRIMEDIA, and American Lawyer Media.

Liz Worthington, director of content strategy, American Press Institute
Liz Worthington is the Director of Content Strategy at the American Press Institute. She manages API's program Metrics for News to help publishers better understand their audiences and create data-informed content strategies. Prior to joining API, Liz worked for nearly 10 years as a reporter and editor for newspapers and digital platforms, including Patch.com, the Island Packet and the Culpeper Star-Exponent. Liz is a 2005 J-school graduate from the University of Missouri. She lives in Weehawken, NJ, with her husband and 3-year-old daughter.


Power Shift: Managing Personalities

Friday, Sept. 28, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Managing a news operation is a tough job. You need to make decisions quickly on story selection, on presentation, on ethics and you need to manage the personalities in you operation. From the top investigative reporter to the rookie reporters, the way you manage the personalities will determine how successful your operation will be. Jill Geisler and Scott Libin will return to EIJ18 and present this breakout session, which involves everyone in the room!

Speakers: Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago; Scott Libin, Chairman, RTDNA and Hubbard senior fellow, University of Minnesota

Click for speaker information


Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago
Jill Geisler is the Bill Plante Chair in Leadership and Media Integrity at Loyola University Chicago and a respected voice on newsroom management and ethics. She teaches and coaches in news organizations worldwide. In 2018, she was named the Freedom Forum Institute Fellow in Women’s Leadership and leads its Power Shift Project, the Newseum’s groundbreaking program to eradicate harassment and discrimination in media workplaces.

She is the author of “Work Happy: What Great Bosses Know,” produces the podcast “Q&A: Leadership and Integrity in the Digital Age,” and writes a monthly management column for the Columbia Journalism Review. Previously, she headed the leadership and management programs of the Poynter Institute and was among the country’s first female TV news directors. She’s been inducted to multiple media halls of fame and is the recipient of RTDNA’s Oldfield Distinguished Service award.

Scott Libin, Chairman, RTDNA and Hubbard senior fellow, University of Minnesota
Scott Libin is Senior Fellow at the University of Minnesota’s Hubbard School of Journalism and Mass Communication. He has three decades of experience as a journalist, including jobs on camera and behind the scenes, as a news director and as an educator. He is a consultant, coach and communications professional, specializing in broadcast and digital journalism.

Scott was vice president of news and content at Internet Broadcasting 20112014. He previously led newsrooms at WCCO-TV and KSTP-TV in the Twin Cities and at WGHP-TV in the Greensboro, N.C., market. He has twice been a full-time member of the resident faculty at The Poynter Institute in St. Petersburg, Fla., and has trained journalists from Newfoundland to South Africa to China. Scott began his career as a congressional press secretary and as a bureau reporter in Washington, D.C. He was a reporter and weekend anchor in North Carolina before entering management.

Scott is chairman of the board of the Radio Television Digital News Association and former chairman of the RTDNA Ethics Committee. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the National Scholastic Press Association and served for 10 years on the Board of Advisors of ThreeSixty Journalism, a teen outreach program of the University of St. Thomas.


Does your coverage look like your community?

Friday, Sept. 28, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

How well do news managers know their local communities? Are stories assigned because they come to you or are you actively staying in touch with the interests and needs of you "whole" community? This session will highlight how news managers can inspire issue based enterprise reporting for all communities in a coverage area.

Speaker: Richard Dyer, President and General Manager, WUSA9

Click for speaker information


Richard Dyer, President and General Manager, WUSA9
Richard J. Dyer is the President and General Manager of WUSA9, the CBS affili ate and TEGNA owned station in Washington, D.C. Dyer assumed his new role i n January of 2017, returning to his hometown.

Previously Richard J. Dyer was the President and General Manager of WLWT-T V, the Hearst Television affiliate in Cincinnati for fourteen years. Prior to joining WLWT in December 2002, Dyer was President and General Manager of Hearst’ s ABC affiliate, KETV in Omaha, Nebraska.

Before joining Hearst, Dyer served as Corporate Vice President of Television Sal es at Gannett Television, which is now TEGNA Media. Previously, he served in various roles at WUSA9 including Vice President and Station Manager and also at Gannett’s KSDK-TV, St. Louis, where he was Vice President, Broadcast.

A native of Washington, D.C., Dyer is a graduate of Archbishop Carroll High sch ool. Dyer grew up in the Washington, D.C. NE neighborhood of Riggs Park with his parents who are also D.C. natives. He holds a Master’s Degree in Marketing from the University of Maryland and a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics and Com munications from Boston College. While attending Boston College, Dyer was an outstanding member of BC Eagles football team and served as its captain his se nior year.

Dyer is the past Board Chairman for the Ohio Association of Broadcasters, the D evelopment Chairperson for the Urban League of Greater Cincinnati, a member of the University of Cincinnati Electronic Media Advisory Board. Dyer was also a n Advisory Board member of the Hamilton County American Cancer Society and past Board Chairman of the Ruth Lyon’s Children’s Fund.

Richard and his wife, Yvonne, reside in Bowie, Maryland and have two children.


Power Shift: Workplace integrity

Friday, Sept. 28, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Traditional anti-harassment policies and training failed to prevent the sexual misconduct scandals that have rocked media organizations this past year. That’s why the Newseum’s Freedom Forum Institute tapped Jill Geisler to create a totally new approach to the problem of workplace harassment, discrimination and incivility. Jill’s Workplace Integrity curriculum is designed for newsrooms and is built on 3 pillars: Critical Thinking, Courageous Conversations and Cultures of Integrity and Trust. Today’s session is a short-form version that will give skills you can put to work immediately in your own shop.

Speaker: Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago

Click for speaker information


Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago
Jill Geisler (@JillGeisler) is the Bill Plante Chair in Leadership and Media Integrity at Loyola University Chicago and a respected voice on newsroom management and ethics. She teaches and coaches in news organizations worldwide. In 2018, she was named the Freedom Forum Institute Fellow in Women’s Leadership and leads its Power Shift Project, the Newseum’s groundbreaking program to eradicate harassment and discrimination in media workplaces.

She is the author of “Work Happy: What Great Bosses Know,” produces the podcast “Q&A: Leadership and Integrity in the Digital Age,” and writes a monthly management column for the Columbia Journalism Review. Previously, she headed the leadership and management programs of the Poynter Institute and was among the country’s first female TV news directors. She’s been inducted to multiple media halls of fame and is the recipient of RTDNA’s Oldfield Distinguished Service award.


News Directors: How well do you know your GM?

Friday, Sept. 28, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

One of the top measures of success and longevity for a news director is the quality of the relationship s/he has with the general manager. This fun, interactive "Newlywed Game"-style event will quiz ND's on how well they know (and work with) their bosses.

Speakers: Chip Mahaney, news director, WCPO-TV Cincinnati; Stephen Hayes, general manager, WTVR-TV Richmond; Sheryl Barnhouse, news director, WTVR-TV Richmond; Larry Cottrill, general manager, WRIC-TV Richmond; Shane Moreland, news director, WRIC-TV Richmond; Bill Hooper, general manager, WMAR-TV Baltimore; Kelly Groft, news director, WMAR-TV Baltimore

Click for speaker information


Chip Mahaney, news director, WCPO-TV Cincinnati
Chip Mahaney has nearly 40 years experience in news, primarily in television and digital, with 20 of those years in leadership positions at local and corporate levels. Chip is currently News Director at Scripps-flagship WCPO in Cincinnati. He has worked 10 years for Scripps, with most of that time in various digital roles at the company’s headquarters. Before coming to Scripps in 2008, Chip worked for local media organizations in the Fox, Raycom, Gannett and Belo groups.

Chip serves the journalism industry as a member of the RTDNA board of directors. He is a longtime judge of the annual Edward R. Murrow Awards. Chip has mentored dozens of developing journalists over the years, and he currently serves as a professional adviser to Ohio University's E.W. Scripps School of Journalism.


Trust your social media team, and transform your newsroom

Friday, Sept. 28, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

There’s no shortage of blogs, Facebook groups, and conferences that inform journalists on what works and doesn’t in regards to social media in the newsroom. It’s a lot to keep up with, so how can a journalist avoid being left behind? 4 experts in managing this at scale explain how newsrooms (and journalists alone) can cut through the noise, find actionable advice, and stay on top of the ever-changing state of social.

Speakers: John Colucci, social media director, Sinclair Broadcast Group; Sheryl Worsley, director of audience development, Bonneville Salt Lake; Bob Bennett, senior producer, WAVY-TV 10; Brandon Mercer, general manager, SFGate

Click for speaker information


John Colucci, social media director, Sinclair Broadcast Group
John Colucci is the Social Media Director for Sinclair Broadcast Group, overseeing social media strategy, education, partnerships, projects, and curation & creation of content for all of the company's TV stations and digital properties. In addition to his leadership role, John is an on-camera personality, appearing as a social media reporter for KOMO-TV in Seattle and other Sinclair stations; and previously was a regular contributor to HuffPost Live. John also has spoken at conferences such as SXSW and NABJ. John leaped into the world of social media in 2011 while then in a project management role at Virgin America, and lead numerous creative marketing initiatives for the fledgling airline. John is originally from Edison, NJ and resides in Seattle, WA.

Sheryl Worsley, director of audience development, Bonneville Salt Lake (KSL, KRSP, KSFI)
Sheryl Worsley (@sherylrockin ) is Director of Audience Development at Bonneville Salt Lake (KSL, KRSP, KSFI), responsible for digital content, including social media, website and podcasting. She currently serves as RTDNA's Region 3 Director. A board member and Past president of the Utah Headliners, Sheryl has maintained an active role in fighting for open records and access to government and fighting against threats to journalism.

Bob Bennett, senior producer, WAVY-TV 10
Bob Bennett is Senior Producer for WAVY-TV/WVBT-TV in Norfolk, VA. Bob has 25 years of television experience, and has won numerous Emmys, AP awards, and an Edward R. Murrow award for news coverage. Bob also worked at WJLA-TV, where he produced the 6:00 newscast, as well as worked with the web team to increase the station’s Facebook fan base by more than 100,000 users in less than a year. Besides expertise in social media, Bob also specializes in severe weather coverage and breaking news. Outside of work, Bob mentors young producers and reporters, critiquing their work, and preparing them for a future in television news. Bob is also a member of SPJ and a lifetime member of the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists' Association.

Brandon Mercer, general manager, SFGate
Brandon M. Mercer is the general manager of SFGATE for Hearst Newspapers, overseeing content and operations for the 5th largest newspaper website in America, with 35 million unique monthly users, in addition to overseeing content operations in Seattle. Previously, he ran CBS San Francisco, overseeing sites for 6 radio and television stations. He’s also worked as a television news director (KTXL) and executive producer. Mercer’s background is primarily in newsroom transformation, creating systems to help lead change and seize opportunities in a constantly evolving content ecosystem.


Hiring managers: Diversity isn't a pipeline problem. It could be you.

Friday, Sept. 28, 3-4 p.m.

This moderated discussion will chronicle the experience of Tahera Rahman, the first full-time on air broadcast reporter in the U.S. to wear a hijab, and the manager who hired her.

Moderator: Will Federman, executive editor, The Tylt

Speakers: Mike Mickle, news director, WHBF/WKLB-TV; Tahera Rahman, reporter, WHBF-TV

Click for speaker information


Will Federman, executive editor, The Tylt
Will Federman is the executive editor for The Tylt—the first major venture launched out of Advance Digital’s in-house media incubator—overseeing all editorial operations for the largest and fastest growing social polling and opinion platform amongst millennials. The innovative social media-centric startup combines human storytellers and proprietary technology to debate and visualize community opinions in real-time. He previously oversaw the team responsible for audience growth and engagement for FORTUNE magazine. Will graduated from USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, where he also served as executive editor for the school’s award-winning digital publication. He currently lives in Harlem with his wife and three adorable cats.

Tahera Rahman, reporter, WHBF-TV
Tahera Rahman (@TaheraTV) is a news reporter at WHBF-TV, a CBS affiliate in the Quad Cities. She is the first full-time TV news reporter in the United States to wear a hijab. She was hired by News Director, Mike Mickle. Prior to this position, she was a producer for the same station, creating the evening broadcasts. Tahera started her career as producer of a community radio show in Chicago. She has also worked with Al Jazeera English in Doha, Qatar, and CBS Evening News Chicago bureau. Tahera graduated from Loyola University Chicago Magna Cum Laude in journalism & international studies, where she was first Muslim editor-in-chief of The Loyola Phoenix, the university’s award-winning, weekly newspaper.

Mike Mickle, news director, WHBF/WKLB-TV
Mike Mickle (@mikemickle) is the News Director at WHBF-Local 4 and KLJB-Fox 18 in Rock Island, Illinois. Mike has more than 30 years of broadcast news experience. He’s worked as an anchor, reporter, executive producer, assignment editor and weather anchor. His work has been recognized with awards in Oklahoma, Arkansas, Iowa and Illinois.

Mike is also a documentary film producer. He’s currently nominated for an Emmy for his work on a prime-time news special that aired on Nexstar station, WHBF. “If You Only Knew: The Journey Through Teen Depression and Suicide” has also aired on PBS stations across the Midwest.

Since his arrival at WHBF/KLJB the newsroom has seen a dramatic increase in digital growth. The station’s digital page views have grown almost 200% in the past year. Mike and his wife Karen have three children.


Stop Your State Legislature from Stifling Your Press Freedom

Saturday, Sept. 29, 9-10 a.m.

Journalists and their managers need to engage early in the legislative process or bad laws will get passed. This panel will give examples from state legislatures this year and what was done by journalists in each market to combat bad actors and bad legislation. The goal of this panel is to encourage journalists or their managers and companies to get involved on the local front to combat threats to the First Amendment and open records.

Speakers: David C. Reymann, First Amendment attorney, Parr Brown Gee & Loveless; Joel Campbell, past president, Utah Headliners and associate professor, BYU School of Communications; Sheryl Worsley, director of audience development, Bonneville Salt Lake and RTDNA Region 3 director; Scott Sternberg, general counsel, Louisiana State Press Association and partner, Sternberg, Nacri & White

Click for speaker information


David C. Reymann, First Amendment attorney, Parr Brown Gee & Loveless
In his First Amendment and media law practice, Mr. Reymann represents the media and individuals in matters involving the First Amendment and the public’s right to know, including defamation, open records law, access to court and governmental proceedings, anti-SLAPP litigation, online liability, anonymous speech, and related areas of constitutional law. Mr. Reymann has represented every media organization in Utah and a number of national organizations, including CNN, the Associated Press, Viacom, CBS, NBCUniversal, and Fox Television Stations. Since 1999, Mr. Reymann has helped staff the Freedom of Information Hotline at Parr Brown, which provides pro bono assistance to the news media and citizens seeking access to government records and proceedings.

Joel Campbell, past president, Utah Headliners and associate professor, BYU School of Communications
Joel Campbell (@joelcampbell) is an associate teaching professor in journalism in Brigham Young University School of Communications. Along with serving on the Utah Headliners Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists board on several occasions, he has been active on behalf of journalists in important First Amendment and Freedom of Information legislative lobbying and legal cases. He was part of a team that successfully called for the repeal of 2011 law that Utah's public records law in the 2011 Utah Legislature. He has also worked on several occasions to convince lawmakers to enact major revisions to the Utah Open and Public Meetings Act.

Sheryl Worsley, director of audience development, Bonneville Salt Lake and RTDNA Region 3 director
Sheryl Worsley (@sherylrockin) is Director of Audience Development at Bonneville Salt Lake (KSL, KRSP, KSFI). She is also currently serving as RTDNA's Region 3 Director. A board member and Past president of the Utah Headliners, Sheryl has maintained an active role in fighting for open records and access to government and fighting against threats to journalism.


Scott Sternberg, general counsel, Louisiana State Press Association and partner, Sternberg, Nacri & White
Scott Sternberg is a Partner with Sternberg, Naccari & White, LLC, where he is counsel to media entities throughout Louisiana. Scott is general counsel to the Louisiana Press Association and works with newspapers and citizens throughout Louisiana. As general counsel, he reviews all relevant legislation pending before the Louisiana Legislature and testifies on press-related issues. Scott regularly speaks and writes in the area of government accountability and access, constitutional law, ethics and media issues. Scott teaches at Loyola University New Orleans's School of Mass Communication and often takes pro bono representation of citizens who have been wronged or are seeking public records. He has a journalism and law degrees from Louisiana State University.


[ Jump to: News Management | Newsgathering | Digital | Career Development | Sponsored ]


Newsgathering

Sessions in the Newsgathering track will teach attendees about ethical journalism, access, FOI and more. Learn from some of the best in the business about how they do their job, and how they can make your job even more impactful.

Repairing the neglect: How journalists can engage with diverse communities

Thursday, Sept. 27, 1-2 p.m.

In this interactive session, attendees will work in small groups to examine their own identities in order to help them rethink their approach to interviewing sources, doing research in their communities and interacting with the public. We will look more broadly at the role that empathy plays in ethical journalism and how journalists can practice empathy in their work. This session will use as its foundation American Press Institute research about empathy and how it can help journalists engage more deeply with diverse communities and repair relationships with communities that they have ignored or marginalized.

Speakers: Amy Kovac-Ashley, director of newsroom learning, American Press Institute; Katherine Ellis, program associate, American Press Institute.

Click for speaker information


Amy Kovac-Ashley, director of newsroom learning, American Press Institute
Amy L. Kovac-Ashley (@terabithia4) is the director of newsroom learning at the American Press Institute. Her work focuses on newsroom culture, transformational change, talent development and diversity.

Kovac-Ashley has worked as a journalism educator and administrator on the undergraduate and graduate levels at West Virginia University and Georgetown University, respectively. Prior to that, she spent a dozen years as a professional journalist. She reported on education and other local affairs at The Herald News and The Roanoke Times and was an editor at Foreign Policy magazine, Patch.com and The Washington Post, where she was the paper’s first social media editor. She holds a master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and a master’s degree and bachelor’s degree from Stanford University.

Katherine Ellis, program associate, American Press Institute
Katherine Ellis (@katherinekellis) is a program associate for the American Press Institute focusing primarily on marketing outreach and diversity initiatives. She is a former Next Gen Radio fellow and also spent time at USA Today NetworkWisconsin. Ellis is a graduate of the University of Utah where she studied journalism, marketing and public relations. While in college, she served as editor-in-chief of the Daily Utah Chronicle and spearheaded its transformation from a daily printed paper to a bi-weekly print, digital first publication.


Getting reluctant sources on the record

Thursday, Sept. 27, 1-2 p.m.

A piece of journalism is only as good as the information it draws from. In this session, learn the importance of sourcing and see where others failed. Also, find out how to get the most reluctant sources on the record and know where to turn when all else fails

Speakers: Lynn Walsh, project manager, Trusting News Project; Andrew Seaman, news editor, LinkedIn

Click for speaker information


Lynn Walsh, project manager, Trusting News Project
Lynn Walsh is an Emmy award-winning journalist who has worked in investigative, data and TV journalism at the national level as well as locally in California, Ohio, Texas and Florida. Currently, she is the Project Manager for the Trusting News project, where she works to help rebuild trust between journalists and the public by working with newsrooms to be more transparent about how they do their jobs. She is a digital explorer and an international speaker and trainer, working to encourage transparency, media engagement, digital innovation and free expression rights for all.

Andrew Seaman, Ethics Committee chair, Society of Professional Journalists
Andrew Seaman (@andrewmseaman) is a news editor for LinkedIn in New York City and the ethics committee chairman for the Society of Professional Journalists. Before joining LinkedIn, he was digital editor for Reuters. He helped manage the news agency's social media, homepage and app in that role. He previously served as Reuters senior medical journalist. He has served as SPJ's ethics committee chairperson since its Code of Ethics was revised in 2014. Andrew also sits on the alumni board of Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.


Getting Past No: How to successfully appeal and sue for public records

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2:30-3:30 p.m.

When a public official denies your public records request, don't slink away in misery. Fight! Two top FOI experts will provide practical tips for how to appeal a public records denial and then sue on your own.

Speakers: David Cuillier, associate professor, University of Arizona School of Journalism; Lucy A. Dalglish, dean, Philip Merrill College of Journalism

Click for speaker information


David Cuillier, associate professor, University of Arizona School of Journalism
David Cuillier, an associate professor at the University of Arizona School of Journalism, is a former SPJ Freedom of Information chair, former national president of SPJ and a Wells Memorial Key recipient. Before earning his doctorate from Washington State University in 2006 he was a newspaper reporter and editor in the Pacific Northwest. He is co-author with Charles Davis of “The Art of Access: Strategies for Acquiring Public Records,” has testified before Congress regarding FOIA, is a member of the National Freedom of Information Coalition board, and researches psychological strategies for acquiring public records.

Lucy A. Dalglish, dean, Philip Merrill College of Journalism
Lucy A. Dalglish became dean of the University of Maryland Philip Merrill College of Journalism in 2012 after 12 years as executive director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press. Before that, she spent five years as a media lawyer in Minneapolis law firm Dorsey & Whitney’s trial department and from 1980 to 1993 was a reporter and editor at the St. Paul Pioneer Press. Dalglish has won the National Press Foundation’s Kiplinger Award, the Society of Professional Journalists’ Wells Memorial Key and is a member of the National Freedom of Information Act Hall of Fame in Washington.


Use the U.S. Census to make you a better reporter

Friday, Sept. 28, 9:15-10:15 a.m.

The American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing survey that generates estimates on social, economic, housing, and demographic topics for all communities in the US. This presentation will cover: Background information about the ACS; What is available: ACS datasets and topics; Demo about how to access ACS data using the American FactFinder.

Moderator: Virginia Hyer, Public Affairs Specialist, U.S. Census Bureau

Panelists: Alexandra Barker, Data Dissemination Specialist, U.S. Census Bureau; Jewel Jordan, Public Affairs Specialist, U.S. Census Bureau

Click for speaker information


Virginia Hyer, Public Affairs Specialist, U.S. Census Bureau
Virginia Hyer joined the Census Bureau in 2011 as a summer intern, where she worked on 2010 Census state-data releases and the communications campaign for the America’s Economy mobile app. In 2013, she became a permanent member of the Media Relations Branch in the Public Information Office and focuses on communication strategy, media relations and social media. In 2016, Virginia took a detail to the Department of Commerce, Office of the Secretary, Office of Public Affairs. There, she served as a press secretary to Secretary Pritzker and coordinated interviews with Fortune 500 companies’ press teams on joint media appearances with the Secretary of Commerce. Virginia received the Department of Commerce Gold Medal award for her work on the America’s Economy Mobile app. She has also received two National Association of Government Communicators honorable mentions for her work on the American Community Survey local news releases and the 10-year anniversary Hurricane Katrina Facts for Features. She received the Director’s Innovation Award for her work on the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Interactive Infographic, 2015. While at the Department of Commerce she also received as Special Act Award for her work on the U.S. Africa Business Forum.

Virginia received her bachelor’s degree in communication at Virginia Tech.

Alexandra Barker, Data Dissemination Specialist, U.S. Census Bureau
Alexandra Barker is the co-founder of the Census Academy, and serves as the Data Dissemination Specialist for the U.S. Census Bureau. She joined the agency in 2008 as part of the media relations team for the 2010 Census. Since then, Alexandra has served in different capacities including supervising the American Community Survey in MA and PR.

In 2013, she integrated the first Data Dissemination team of the Census Bureau, and became responsible for building and maintaining relationships with stakeholders and the media in the northeast states through the dissemination of data. Alexandra conducts over 100 presentations and workshops every year to a variety of organizations, including local governments, congressional offices, businesses, non-profits, media, schools, universities, and tribes.

She is currently leading the development and implementation of the Census Bureau new e-learning hub which will offer continuing education courses using multiple formats.

Alexandra received a her bachelor’s degree in journalism graduated at PUC-Rio (Brazil), and earned her Masters of Science in Public Affairs & International Relations from University of Massachusetts Boston.

Jewel Jordan, Public Affairs Specialist, U.S. Census Bureau
Jewel Jordan is a public affairs specialist in the Public Information Office’s Media Relations Branch. In her position, she provides media with data assistance and training, creates and implements communications campaigns, and assists with media events at the U.S. Census Bureau. Most recently, she coordinated promotions for The Opportunity Project Demo Day on November 29, 2017. Jewel is a recent graduate from Salisbury University and holds a bachelor’s degree in communications with a concentration in public relations. She came to the Census Bureau in 2015 as a Pathways intern and became a permanent employee in 2016.


What it takes to be a Murrow winner

Friday, Sept. 28, 9:15-10:15 a.m.

A Murrow Award is a prestigious honor for a journalist and is recognizes the best in electronic journalism. We will invite an elite group of 2018 National Edward R. Murrow winners to showcase their work and talk about ways all news operations can raise their game.

Moderator: Dan Shelley, executive director, RTDNA/RTDNF

Panelists: Pierre Thomas, senior justice correspondent, ABC News; Dalton Bennett, video reporter, Washington Post; Aaron Henkin, producer, "Out of the Blocks," WYPR

Click for speaker information


Dan Shelley, executive director, RTDNA/RTDNF
Dan Shelley (@MurrowNYC) is Executive Director of the Radio Television Digital News Association and Foundation (RTDNA/RTDNF). He is a longtime member of the Association, a former Chairman of the Board and current Foundation Secretary/Treasurer.

Previously, Dan was Senior Vice President of Digital Content Strategy for iHeartMedia, which reaches a quarter-billion consumers every month through its radio, digital, outdoor, mobile, social and events platforms.

In that role, he was responsible for the development of a national content strategy as well as the execution of all content across iHeart's 850+ radio station sites in 150 markets. He is also tasked with not only growing the current iHeartMedia network but expanding the business model to other audiences through syndication, partnerships and new digital products. He is based in New York.

Prior to joining iHeartMedia, Dan Shelley was a Senior Vice President at Interactive One, part of the Radio One family of companies. Radio One, Inc., is the nation’s only multi-platform media company primarily serving African- American and other urban audiences.

Dan oversaw the digital platforms of Radio One’s 55 radio stations. He also managed relationships with other digital publishers that partnered with iOne, including fellow Radio One companies Reach Media (nationally syndicated radio shows) and the cable network TV One. Prior to joining Radio One, Dan was Director of Digital Media at WCBS-TV, New York, the flagship station of the CBS Television Stations Group. While there, he transformed wcbstv.com from fifth place to first place among local television news websites in the nation’s largest media market. He also helped other CBS owned and operated TV stations across the country enhance their digital strategies.

Dan’s career includes many years in radio management. He was news director/assistant program director at WTMJ-AM in Milwaukee where he was in charge of news and special events coverage. He also helped run operations for WTMJ’s Green Bay Packers, Milwaukee Brewers and Milwaukee Bucks radio networks. Before Milwaukee, Dan was news director at KTTS-AM/FM in his hometown of Springfield, Mo.

Pierre Thomas, senior justice correspondent, ABC News
Pierre Thomas is the Senior Justice Correspondent for ABC News. He joined the network in November 2000 and reports for “World News Tonight with David Muir,” “Good Morning America,” “Nightline,” “This Week with George Stephanopoulos” and other ABC News programs.

Thomas participated in a “World News Tonight with Peter Jennings” broadcast, which won the Edward R. Murrow Award for best newscast in 2005. He was a key part of the ABC News team honored with three additional Murrow Awards in 2012 for the network’s coverage of the tragic Tucson shooting and the killing of Osama Bin Laden, in 2014 for ABC’s coverage that included the Boston marathon terrorist attacks, and he was a main contributor when ABC News received 2016 Murrow awards for Overall Excellence and Breaking News. Thomas was named the recipient of the RTDNA 2015 John F. Hogan Distinguished Service Award, which is named after the organization’s founder and first president and honors contributions to journalism and freedom of the press, and acted as host of the RTDNA’s First Amendment Awards in 2016.

Thomas received an Emmy Award as part of team coverage of the inauguration of President Barack Obama and, in 2011, the Houston Association of Black Journalists honored him with its Pinnacle Award. He was recently featured in the American Journalism Review, and, in 2011, was the focus of an hour-long CSPAN broadcast about his career and thoughts on journalism. In 2012, Thomas was named Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists.

Dalton Bennett, video reporter, Washington Post
Dalton Bennett is a video reporter embedded with the investigations unit of The Washington Post. Since joining The Post in 2016, he has examined Alabama Senate Candidate Roy Moore, political appointees and most recently Paul Manafort. Before joining The Post, Bennett worked for The Associated Press, based in Berlin, Dubai, Athens, and Bishkek covering a range of topics from conflict to a charcoal smuggling network linked to Al-Shabab. He is a member of the team awarded the 2018 Pulitzer Prize in investigative reporting.

Aaron Henkin, producer, "Out of the Blocks," WYPR
Aaron Henkin creates original programming for Baltimore’s NPR station, WYPR. His documentary series, Out of the Blocks, shares stories from Baltimore and beyond, one city block at a time. Out of the Blocks has earned a national Edward R Murrow Award and is distributed as a podcast through PRX.

Aaron’s work also includes the long-running weekly cultural show, The Signal, and the Smithsonian Folkways Recordings program, Tapestry of the Times. Aaron's stories have aired nationally on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, PRI's Studio 360, and The World.


Money Matters: The best in consumer finance reporting

Friday, Sept. 28, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Featuring the RTDNA/NEFE Excellence in Personal Finance Reporting Award winners, the Money Matters session will highlight the best in TV, radio and digital consumer finance journalism. Panelists will break down their award-winning pieces, share key reporting tools and best practices. You'll walk away with new ways to creatively approach financial reporting and make comprehensive topics more digestible to viewers and listeners.

Moderator: Dan Shelley, executive director, RTDNA/RTDNF

Panelists: Jill Schlesinger, business analyst, CBS News Radio; Susannah Snider, personal finance editor, U.S. News and World Report; Jason Wheeler, anchor and reporter, WFAA-TV; Billy Hensley, President and CEO, National Endowment for Financial Education

Click for speaker information


Dan Shelley, executive director, RTDNA/RTDNF
Dan Shelley (@MurrowNYC) is Executive Director of the Radio Television Digital News Association and Foundation (RTDNA/RTDNF). He is a longtime member of the Association, a former Chairman of the Board and current Foundation Secretary/Treasurer.

Previously, Dan was Senior Vice President of Digital Content Strategy for iHeartMedia, which reaches a quarter-billion consumers every month through its radio, digital, outdoor, mobile, social and events platforms.

In that role, he was responsible for the development of a national content strategy as well as the execution of all content across iHeart's 850+ radio station sites in 150 markets. He is also tasked with not only growing the current iHeartMedia network but expanding the business model to other audiences through syndication, partnerships and new digital products. He is based in New York.

Prior to joining iHeartMedia, Dan Shelley was a Senior Vice President at Interactive One, part of the Radio One family of companies. Radio One, Inc., is the nation’s only multi-platform media company primarily serving African- American and other urban audiences.

Dan oversaw the digital platforms of Radio One’s 55 radio stations. He also managed relationships with other digital publishers that partnered with iOne, including fellow Radio One companies Reach Media (nationally syndicated radio shows) and the cable network TV One. Prior to joining Radio One, Dan was Director of Digital Media at WCBS-TV, New York, the flagship station of the CBS Television Stations Group. While there, he transformed wcbstv.com from fifth place to first place among local television news websites in the nation’s largest media market. He also helped other CBS owned and operated TV stations across the country enhance their digital strategies.

Dan’s career includes many years in radio management. He was news director/assistant program director at WTMJ-AM in Milwaukee where he was in charge of news and special events coverage. He also helped run operations for WTMJ’s Green Bay Packers, Milwaukee Brewers and Milwaukee Bucks radio networks. Before Milwaukee, Dan was news director at KTTS-AM/FM in his hometown of Springfield, Mo.

Jill Schlesinger, business analyst, CBS News Radio
Jill Schlesinger (@jillonmoney), CFP®, is the Emmy-nominated and Gracie Award Winning Business Analyst for CBS News. She covers the economy, markets, investing and anything else with a dollar sign on TV, radio (including her nationally syndicated show, “Jill on Money,” which won the 2018 Gracie Award for Best National Talk Show), on the “Better Off” podcast and her blog, "Jill on Money." Jill also serves as the Senior CFP Board Ambassador for the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. Prior to her second career at CBS, Jill spent 14 years as the co-owner and Chief Investment Officer for an independent investment advisory firm. She began her career as a self-employed options trader on the Commodities Exchange of New York, following her graduation from Brown University. Jill's first book, The Dumb Things Smart People Do With Their Money, will be published in February, 2019, by Ballantine Books.

Susannah Snider, personal finance editor, U.S. News and World Report
Susannah Snider (@SusSnider) is the Personal Finance editor at U.S. News. Since 2010, she has reported on a wide range of personal finance topics, from consumer travel to college financial aid, student loans and employment. Snider previously worked as a staff writer at Kiplinger's Personal Finance magazine and holds a master's degree in journalism from the University of Southern California. She has appeared as a personal finance expert on television, radio and in print, including on "Fox & Friends," "The Tavis Smiley Show" and Fox Business News.

Jason Wheeler, anchor and reporter, WFAA-TV
Jason (@jasonwheelertv) has been recognized with two Edward R. Murrow Awards, three Emmy Awards, & multiple Texas Associated Press Awards.

Born in Galveston County, Jason grew up in the Houston area. He has since lived in every major metropolitan area in Texas. Jason graduated from the University of Houston before setting out on a two-decade long career as an anchor, host, documentary producer, and reporter in television markets around the country.

His latest assignment at News8 is anchoring the weekday 4 p.m. newscast and contributing in-depth special reports for News8 at 10.

From his previous stops in Austin, Miami, San Antonio, Pittsburgh, and El Paso, Jason has chased hurricanes, reported from the front lines of record breaking wildfires, handled war correspondent duties from Washington, tagged along on the presidential campaign trail, been a financial news editor, witnessed shuttle launches, taken off and landed on aircraft carriers, hosted a lifestyle/entertainment show, traipsed through the Amazon jungle, and boated out to sea in search of a potential multi-billion dollar treasure. Jason is particularly interested in international, science, and business/consumer news. Jason has been recognized with two Edward R. Murrow Awards, three Emmy Awards, & multiple Texas Associated Press Awards.

Billy Hensley, President and CEO, National Endowment for Financial Education
Billy J. Hensley, Ph.D. (@DrBillyHensley) is the senior director of education for the National Endowment for Financial Education(r) (NEFE) where he oversees the grants and research department, including management of NEFE's consumer education programs, collegiate initiatives, and e-learning and web strategy. His primary research interests are financial education, teacher professional development and assessment, the sociocultural influences on behavioral choices, and curriculum design. Prior to joining NEFE in 2010, he was a Research Fellow at the University of Cincinnati and has held program management positions at KnowledgeWorks Foundation and the Ohio College Access Network. Hensley is the recipient of the Rising Star Alumni Award from Union College, where he earned a B.S. in psychology and received the Outstanding Doctoral Student of the Year Award in Educational Studies from the University of Cincinnati where he earned a Ph.D. In addition to his work at NEFE, he is on the adjunct faculty with the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Louisville, is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning, serves on the Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy board of directors, where is chairs the education committee, and recently served a term on the national evaluation advisory board for AfterSchool All-Stars.


Bad News Writing: The no good, the bad and the ugly

Friday, Sept. 28, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

News writing from the network level to the smallest market can be awful; it is often filled with cliches that wreak havoc (cliche) on the tight-knit communities (cliche) on which we report. In this presentation by Christopher Cruise, RTDNA bad-news writing columnist and radio news anchor at The Voice of America and Westwood One News, we'll look at some of the most pervasive of these cliches and talk about ways we can report without resorting to journalese.

Speaker: Christopher Jones-Cruise, radio news anchor, The Voice of America and Westwood One News

Click for speaker information


Christopher Jones-Cruise, radio news anchor, The Voice of America and Westwood One News
Christopher Jones-Cruise is a radio news anchor at The Voice of America and Westwood One News. He has anchored on the CNN Radio Network, CNN Headline News and XM Satellite Radio's USA Today Channel. He also teaches classes in American political history. He was an Army broadcaster and has worked in Maine, North Carolina, Atlanta and Washington, DC. He got his first paycheck as a reporter when he was 12.

He has traveled extensively throughout the US and to South Korea, Guatemala, Germany, Italy and Barbados.


Get people to talk: Lessons from a career prosecutor

Friday, Sept. 28, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

"When it comes to interviewing skills, chemistry sparks credibility. Learn to quickly perceive and accommodate the emotional and dispositional traits of your subject, to generate the trust necessary to elicit the information you need. At the same time, learn to spot signs of deception that could cast doubt on the integrity of the information you receive. This program will teach you how to quickly and easily size up everyone you meet, from the most transparent to the most combative, and tailor your communication style accordingly. By selecting an interviewing approach customized to the personality and emotional needs of your subject, you maximize the ability to elicit useful information, and detect deception. "

Speaker: Wendy L. Patrick, criminal attorney, San Diego

Click for speaker information


Wendy L. Patrick, criminal attorney, San Diego
Wendy L. Patrick, JD, PhD, is a career prosecutor, recognized by her peers as one of the Top Ten criminal attorneys in San Diego by the San Diego Daily Transcript, and named the Public Lawyer of the Year by the California State Bar Public Law Section. She has completed over 160 trials ranging from hate crimes, to domestic violence, to first-degree murder.

She is also a media commentator with over 3,000 media appearances, including CNN, Fox News Channel, and Fox Business Network, HLN, and a variety of other national and international programs. She also serves as a radio guest host.


No Guts, No Story: Doing great work, even on deadline

Friday, Sept. 28, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Great video stories connect to the audience through powerful sound and memorable characters. But who has the time? Working under tight deadlines and challenging conditions doesn't stop this team. Baltimore's Fox 45 reporter Kathleen Cairns and photojournalist Alanna Delfino turn everyday assignments into memorable stories. For them, doing great work against the clock takes guts and commitment to the craft. In this session, these multiple Murrow, Emmy, and NPPA award winning journalists will share tips to help you make your daily stories stand out from the competition.

Speakers: Kathleen Cairns, reporter, FOX 45 Baltimore; Alanna Delfino, photojournalist, FOX 45 Baltimore

Click for speaker information


Kathleen Cairns, reporter, FOX 45 Baltimore
As a general assignment reporter for Baltimore’s Fox 45, Kathleen Cairns specializes in moment-driven storytelling of hard news.

Kathleen’s been recognized with 28 regional Emmys, including 2016’s award for reporting. She’s also a member of the NATAS Silver Circle. She’s a two-time finalist for the NPPA’s Reporter of the Year award and is a former Chesapeake AP 'Best Reporter' award winner.

She was part of the team that started Fox45 in 1991. Kathleen has covered papal visits, provided live coverage from BWI on September 11th, and the beltway sniper. Much of her award-winning reporting occurred during the 2015 Baltimore riots.

Kathleen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Albany.

Alanna Delfino, photojournalist, FOX 45 Baltimore
Behind her lens, Alanna Delfino finds the special moments that turn an assignment into a memorable story. A photojournalist at Baltimore’s Fox45, Alanna specializes in producing daily news stories under deadline, with a creative, unique approach.

Alanna’s work has earned her several awards, including nine NATAS Regional Emmy nominations this year, the National Press Photographers Association Regional Photographer of the Year, and Finalist for the NPPA’s National Television News Photographer of the year.

Alanna is an alum of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism where she’s adjunct faculty. She is also a faculty member of the NPPA’s News Video Workshop.


Stop Scanning: Gathering better information from police communications

Friday, Sept. 28, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Some of the best news stories start off as garbled transmissions over police scanners, but is that a sustainable method of crime reporting in a digital age? FirstNet, a nationwide network for emergency officials, could make scanners a technology of the past. Additionally, journalists are met by increasingly skeptical and closed off police forces. Learn what journalists need to know about the future of emergency communication systems and how to navigate modern police departments from this panel of experts.

Speakers: Lynn Walsh, project manager, Trusting News Project; Ron Snyder, Maryland State Police; Jessica Rahn, WBAL; Shawn Vinson, director of public affairs, Baltimore County Police Department

Click for speaker information


Lynn Walsh, project manager, Trusting News Project
Lynn Walsh is an Emmy award-winning journalist who has worked in investigative, data and TV journalism at the national level as well as locally in California, Ohio, Texas and Florida. Currently, she is the Project Manager for the Trusting News project, where she works to help rebuild trust between journalists and the public by working with newsrooms to be more transparent about how they do their jobs. She is a digital explorer and an international speaker and trainer, working to encourage transparency, media engagement, digital innovation and free expression rights for all.

Shawn Vinson, director of public affairs, Baltimore County Police Department
Corporal Shawn Vinson is the Director of the Public Affairs Section for the Baltimore County Police Department. In this position, he oversees a staff consisting of a full-time Public Information Officer, Public Information Specialists, administrative staff, and on-call personnel. Shawn serves as the Police Department’s spokesman and supervises the Department’s social media pages. The Public Affairs Section is responsible for releasing information to the media and the public concerning public safety issues, searches for critical missing people, serious crimes, and fatal vehicle crashes throughout Baltimore County on a 24-hour basis.

Shawn is also a member of the Maryland Bar since December 2004. His legal experience includes serving as an Assistant State’s Attorney for Harford County (Maryland) for just over a year and serving as a Special Assistant County Attorney for Baltimore County, on behalf of the Baltimore County Police Department for 10 years.


Navigating the FOI Universe: Who's who in getting access

Friday, Sept. 28, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Learn new galaxies of groups in the freedom of information universe that can help you access public records, including those working in libraries, civil society nonprofits, law school clinics, research labs, and state coalitions. We will map out the FOI landscape, show where you can get resources and litigation help, and provide findings from recent studies by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and Open The Government.

Speakers: David Cuillier, associate professor, University of Arizona School of Journalism; Lisa Rosenberg, executive director, Open the Government

Click for speaker information


David Cuillier, associate professor, University of Arizona School of Journalism
David Cuillier, an associate professor at the University of Arizona School of Journalism, is a former SPJ Freedom of Information chair, former national president of SPJ and a Wells Memorial Key recipient. Before earning his doctorate from Washington State University in 2006 he was a newspaper reporter and editor in the Pacific Northwest. He is co-author with Charles Davis of “The Art of Access: Strategies for Acquiring Public Records,” has testified before Congress regarding FOIA, is a member of the National Freedom of Information Coalition board, and researches psychological strategies for acquiring public records.

Lisa Rosenberg, executive director, Open the Government
Lisa Rosenberg is the Executive Director of Open the Government, an inclusive, nonpartisan coalition that works to strengthen our democracy and empower the public by advancing policies that create a more transparent, accountable, and responsive government. Lisa led advocacy efforts at the Sunlight Foundation and the Center for Responsive Politics. She was an advisor to Senator John Kerry and counsel to Senator John Glenn. Lisa has spoken nationally and internationally on democracy related issues, has testified before Congress, and has appeared on national media. She is a graduate of Tulane University and the George Washington University School of Law.


Covering [Insert Recent Mass Shooting Here]: How to Ethically Cover Mass Shootings

Friday, Sept. 28, 3-4 p.m.

Mass shootings are among the most traumatic breaking news stories a journalist may ever cover. When a shooting takes place in your community, it’s sure to be a difficult and emotional time for everyone — including journalists working in your newsroom to provide desperately sought information. And, as in any breaking news situation, reporting accurately and completely may be particularly challenging. After a mass shooting has occurred is no time to be trying to reason through the difficult ethical decisions such coverage warrants. Ensure your newsroom is prepared by planning ahead, even — especially — for the kinds of situations we hope never to see. In this session we’ll address, how to ensure your own and others’ safety on a scene, how to apply our Code of Ethics’ guiding principles of accuracy and transparency when much is unknown or uncertain, how to put information in the appropriate context, and how to avoid the contagion effect.

Speakers: Andrew Seaman, news editor, LinkedIn; Kristin Hussey, freelance reporter, The New York Times; Tim Scheld, director of news and programming, WCBS; Terence Shepherd, news director, WLRN

Click for speaker information


Andrew Seaman, news editor, LinkedIn
Andrew Seaman (@andrewmseaman) is a news editor for LinkedIn in New York City and the ethics committee chairman for the Society of Professional Journalists. Before joining LinkedIn, he was digital editor for Reuters. He helped manage the news agency's social media, homepage and app in that role. He previously served as Reuters senior medical journalist. He has served as SPJ's ethics committee chairperson since its Code of Ethics was revised in 2014. Andrew also sits on the alumni board of Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.

Kristin Hussey, freelance reporter, The New York Times
Kristin Hussey (@kristinhussey1) is a Connecticut-based freelance reporter. Since 2007, she has reported on the Sandy Hook mass shooting, corruption, philanthropy, business, guns, politics, poverty, resilience, pizza and prom dresses for The New York Times. B.C., Kristin was a staff writer for WSJ.com, The Capital in Annapolis, Md., and The News in Boca Raton, Fla.



Terence Shepherd, news director, WLRN
Terence Shepherd (@terenceshepherd) is news director at WLRN News, the public radio news outlet serving South Florida. He and his staff are covering the Parkland mass shooting. Shepherd is also Region 13 director and Ethics Committee chair of the Radio Television Digital News Association and was a 2016 fellow in public media’s Next Generation Leadership program. Before WLRN he was a business editor at The Miami Herald and at the Boca Raton News.

Tim Scheld, director of news and programming, WCBS
Tim Scheld (@TimScheld) is the Director of News and Programming at WCBS Newsradio 880 in New York and Region 11 Director of the Radio Television Digital News Association. Scheld provided on-scene reporting on the Oklahoma City Bombing, the Los Angeles and San Francisco earthquakes; Columbia Space Shuttle Disaster; as well as the school shootings in Paducah, Kentucky; Jonesboro Arkansas and at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. Scheld was part of the team at ABC News that took home a 2001 Peabody Award for coverage of the September 11th Attacks.


The Oregon Experience: How to strengthen public records laws in your state

Friday, Sept. 28, 3-4 p.m.

"In 2017, the Oregon chapter of SPJ seized upon a political moment to help shepherd in major reforms to its public records law. For the first time, agencies have deadlines by which they have to respond. A Sunshine Committee was created to review all 500+ exemptions to the law and scrutinize any further exemption proposals. A Public Records Advocate will help mediate records disputes, provide education and flag wayward agencies. We will look at the Oregon Experience with an eye for how to replicate these efforts in your state to improve local public records laws. "

Speakers: Shasta Kearns Moore, co-chair, Oregon SPJ FOI committee; Nick Budnick, co-chair, Oregon SPJ FOI committee

Click for speaker information


Shasta Kearns Moore, co-chair, Oregon SPJ FOI committee
Shasta Kearns Moore is president of Open Oregon, a National Freedom of Information Coalition chapter, and formerly headed SPJ Oregon's FOI committee. An education reporter for the Portland Tribune, a newspaper in Portland, Ore., she enjoys telling stories that explain government's complex activities to the general public.



Nick Budnick, co-chair, Oregon SPJ FOI committee
Nick Budnick is a reporter for the Portland Tribune, a newspaper in Portland, Ore., and serves as Sunshine Chair for the Oregon Territory Chapter of SPJ. Covering a mix of local and state government, Budnick frequently uses public records. His work on transparency was recognized last year with a national SPJ Sunshine Award.




Rising Threats to Press Freedom

Friday, Sept. 28, 3-4 p.m.

According to Reporters Without Borders/Reporters Sans Frontières (RSF), journalists face growing hostility, not only in authoritarian regimes but also in countries with democratically elected leaders, including here in the United States. Increasingly, journalists have been jailed and murdered as far away as Myanmar and as near as Mexico. Our esteemed panelists from global news organizations, RSF and the James W. Foley Legacy Foundation will discuss the challenges confronted by journalists who are intent on exposing the truth, as well as precautions they can take to protect themselves.

Moderator: J. Alex Tarquinio, 2018-19 president, Society of Professional Journalists

Panelists: Abderrahim Foukara, regional director — Americas, Al Jazeera Media Network; Daphne Pellegrino, North American advocacy officer, Reporters Without Borders/Reporters Sans Frontières; Diane Foley, president/founder/executive director, the James W. Foley Legacy Foundation; J. Jesus Esquivel, Washington Correspondent, Proceso Magazine of Mexico

Click for speaker information


J. Alex Tarquinio, 2018-19 president, Society of Professional Journalists
J. Alex Tarquinio is the incoming president of the Society of Professional Journalists. She will take office at the society’s annual convention in Baltimore in Sept. 2018. She also serves as a member of the SDX Foundation board, of SPJ’s Legal Defense Fund committee and of the programming committee for the 2018 Excellence in Journalism conference.

Tarquinio has two decades of experience as a writer and editor. She has written about business and politics in the United States, Europe and Asia. Most recently, she covered the negotiations leading up to the first summit between the United States and North Korea in articles for Politico Magazine and the New York Post. Previously, she worked at Dow Jones as a staff writer at The Wall Street Journal’s Smart Money Magazine. Her editing stints included Time Inc., the Real Deal magazine and Forbes.com. She received a German Marshall Fund fellowship for a reporting residency in the divided island nation of Cyprus. As a freelance writer, her byline has appeared in The New York Times (which published nearly 200 of her articles), The International Herald Tribune, The San Francisco Chronicle, Barron’s and Reader’s Digest, among others.

A graduate of the University of California, Santa Cruz and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, she speaks French. She lives in New York City with her husband, Frank.

Abderrahim Foukara, regional director — Americas, Al Jazeera Media Network
Abderrahim Foukara is Al Jazeera Satellite Channel’s Washington, DC Bureau Chief and host of Min Washington (From Washington), one of the most successful and influential programs in the Arab world, offering the Arab viewer an in-depth and well-informed analysis of US Affairs and their impact on North Africa and the Middle East.

Abderrahim Foukara was born and raised in Morocco where he received a B.A. in English. Later, in the UK, he completed a Ph.D. on Apartheid Literature. In 1990 he joined the BBC World Service working in many departments including Arabic, African, French, and English. In 1998 he joined BBC World Service Training as a Senior Instructor, designing and teaching journalism courses. In 1999 he moved to Boston to work as a producer and reporter for The World, a co-production of the BBC, Public Radio International and WGBH Boston. In 2001 he continued to report for the BBC while also serving as visiting senior editor on All Africa, the largest provider of African news, from Washington, DC. In 2002 he joined Al Jazeera TV as a correspondent.

As a veteran journalist with unique insight into US as well as Middle Eastern politics, Abderrahim Foukara served as an essential voice in the US media’s coverage of the Arab Spring, bringing clarity and context to events by appearing as a commentator on Face the Nation, CNN and NPR.

In February 2011, Abderrahim Foukara was featured on the cover of Time Magazine as part of its reporting on Al Jazeera’s coverage of the region’s dramatic changes. His lecture that same year on those changes at the Henry Knox museum in Rockland, ME was a major hit enabling the fundraising event to gross over $50,000.

Daphne Pellegrino, North American advocacy officer, RSF
Daphne Pellegrino joined RSF as Advocacy Officer in March 2018. She was previously an RSF intern and served as Deputy Director of the Humphrey Fellowship Program at the University of Maryland. Daphne received a Bachelor's Degree in multi-platform journalism from the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland in 2017. She is in charge of implementing, developing, and promoting the advocacy campaigns and strategies of RSF in the United States.

Diane Foley, president/founder/executive director, the James W. Foley Legacy Foundation
Diane M. Foley is the mother of five children, including American freelance conflict journalist James W. Foley. She founded the James W. Foley Legacy Foundation in September 2014, less than a month after his public execution. Diane is currently serving as the President and Executive Director of JWFLF. Since 2014, she has led JWFLF efforts to fund the start of Hostage US and the international Alliance for a Culture of Safety, ACOS. In 2015, she actively participated in the National Counterterrorism Center hostage review which culminated in the Presidential Policy Directive-30. This directive re-organized US efforts on behalf of Americans taken hostage abroad into an interagency Hostage Recovery Fusion Cell, Special Presidential Envoy for Hostage Affairs and a White Hostage Response Group. Previously, Diane worked first as a community health nurse and then as a family nurse practitioner for 18 years. She received both her undergraduate and master’s degrees from the University of New Hampshire in Durham, NH.

J. Jesus Esquivel, Washington Correspondent, Proceso Magazine of Mexico
J. Jesus Esquivel is the Washington correspondent of Proceso Magazine of Mexico (political weekly publication like Time Magazine in the US), and collaborator of Carmen Aristegui's news program in Mexico. Since 1988 has been a Washington correspondent for several Mexican news organizations; author of three books, The DEA in Mexico, The CIA, Camarena and Caro Quintero, the secret story and The American Narcs (Los narcos gringos). As a journalist and political analyst, Esquivel has been a contributor of The New York Times, National Public Radio, National Geographic, Univision, Al Jazeera and several radio and television stations in Latin America and Europe.


Fine Fellows: The State of the Industry from SPJ’s Top Award Winners

Saturday, Sept. 29, 9-10 a.m.

As the news industry continues to morph in unexpected ways, Fellows of the Society reflect on their years of distinguished service to journalism and look into the immediate future to consider the opportunities and challenges ahead.

Moderator: J. Alex Tarquinio, 2018-19 president, Society of Professional Journalists

Panelists: Lucy Dalglish, 2015 Fellow, dean of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland; Lawrence Pintak, 2017 Fellow, founding dean, The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication, Washington State University; Robert Rosenthal, 2018 Fellow, executive producer at Reveal/Center for Investigative Reporting; Jerry Ceppos, William B. Dickinson Distinguished Professor Manship School of Mass Communication, Louisiana State University

Click for speaker information


J. Alex Tarquinio, 2018-19 president, Society of Professional Journalists
J. Alex Tarquinio is the incoming president of the Society of Professional Journalists. She will take office at the society’s annual convention in Baltimore in Sept. 2018. She also serves as a member of the SDX Foundation board, of SPJ’s Legal Defense Fund committee and of the programming committee for the 2018 Excellence in Journalism conference.

Tarquinio has two decades of experience as a writer and editor. She has written about business and politics in the United States, Europe and Asia. Most recently, she covered the negotiations leading up to the first summit between the United States and North Korea in articles for Politico Magazine and the New York Post. Previously, she worked at Dow Jones as a staff writer at The Wall Street Journal’s Smart Money Magazine. Her editing stints included Time Inc., the Real Deal magazine and Forbes.com. She received a German Marshall Fund fellowship for a reporting residency in the divided island nation of Cyprus. As a freelance writer, her byline has appeared in The New York Times (which published nearly 200 of her articles), The International Herald Tribune, The San Francisco Chronicle, Barron’s and Reader’s Digest, among others.

A graduate of the University of California, Santa Cruz and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, she speaks French. She lives in New York City with her husband, Frank.

Lucy Dalglish, 2015 Fellow, dean of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland
Lucy A. Dalglish became Dean of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland on August 1, 2012. She served as executive director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press from 2000 to 2012. The Reporters Committee is a voluntary, unincorporated association of reporters and news editors dedicated to protecting the First Amendment interests of the news media. Based in Arlington, Va., the Reporters Committee has provided research, guidance and representation in major press cases in state and federal courts since 1970. Prior to assuming the Reporters Committee position, Dalglish was a media lawyer for almost five years in the trial department of the Minneapolis law firm of Dorsey & Whitney. From 1980 to 1993, Dalglish was a reporter and editor at the St. Paul Pioneer Press. As a reporter, she covered beats ranging from general assignment and suburbs to education and courts. During her last three years at the Pioneer Press, she served as night city editor, assistant news editor and national/foreign editor.

Lawrence Pintak, 2017 Fellow, founding dean, The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication, Washington State University
Lawrence Pintak is an award-winning journalist and scholar who has written about America’s complex relationship with Islam since 1980. He was the founding dean of The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University (2009-2016) and is currently a Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council. He was named a Fellow of the Society of Professional Journalists in 2017 for “outstanding service to the profession of journalism” around the world.

A former CBS News Middle East correspondent with a PhD in Islamic Studies, Pintak been called the foremost chronicler of the interaction between Arab and Western media. His books and articles focus on America’s relationship with the Muslim world, the role of the media in shaping global perceptions and government policy, and the future of journalism in a digital/globalized world.

Robert Rosenthal, 2018 Fellow, executive producer at Reveal/Center for Investigative Reporting
Robert J. Rosenthal is a board member and an executive producer at The Center for Investigative Reporting. An award-winning journalist, Rosenthal has worked for some of the most respected newspapers in the country, including The New York Times, Boston Globe, Philadelphia Inquirer and the San Francisco Chronicle. Rosenthal worked for 22 years at the Inquirer, starting as a reporter and eventually becoming its executive editor in 1998. He became managing editor of the San Francisco Chronicle in late 2002, and joined CIR as executive director in 2008. Before joining the Inquirer in 1979, Rosenthal worked as a reporter for six years at The Boston Globe and three-and-a-half years at The New York Times, where he was a news assistant on the foreign desk and an editorial assistant on the Pulitzer Prize-winning Pentagon Papers project. He has been an adjunct professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and the University of California at Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.

Jerry Ceppos, William B. Dickinson Distinguished Professor Manship School of Mass Communication, Louisiana State University
Before becoming an educator, Jerry Ceppos (@jceppos) spent 36 years in the newspaper business. Among other positions, he was executive editor of the San Jose Mercury News and vice president for news of Knight Ridder, then the secondlargest newspaper company. In 2008, Jerry became dean of the Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Nevada, Reno. In 2011, he was named dean of the Manship School of Mass Communication at LSU. He served as dean until this past June and remains a professor. At LSU, he expanded the school’s signature, teaching and research at the intersection of media and public affairs.Two years ago, he was named a fellow of the Society of Professional Journalists, for extraordinary contributions to the profession. He also is a winner of SPJ’s national Ethics in Journalism Award. In May, the Baton Rouge Area Association of Black Journalists honored Jerry as a “pioneering journalist” for diversifying the faculty of the Manship School. He is a distinguished alumnus of the University of Maryland’s journalism program.


Covering National Security: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Saturday, Sept. 29, 9-10 a.m.

NSA. CIA. FBI. KSB. And more recently Mueller, Putin, Facebook, Twitter and more. Covering national security issues has never been easy. Given today’s political climate, it’s even more important and more ever-present. In this panel, a veteran of the national security beat and a journalist newer to the topic compare notes about what’s important to cover and what’s important to know when reporting on national security topics.

Moderator: Hagit Limor, secretary, Sigma Delta Chi Foundation

Panelists: James Risen, national security correspondent, The Intercept; Derek Hawkins, cybersecurity policy reporter, The Washington Post

Click for speaker information


James Risen, national security correspondent, The Intercept
Jim Risen, a best-selling author and former New York Times reporter, is The Intercept’s senior national security correspondent, based in Washington, D.C. Risen also serves as director of First Look Media’s Press Freedom Defense Fund, which is dedicated to supporting news organizations, journalists, and whistleblowers in legal fights in which a substantial public interest, freedom of the press, or related human or civil right is at stake. At the Times, Risen won the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for his stories about the National Security Agency’s domestic spying program, and he was a member of the reporting team that won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting for coverage of the September 11 attacks and terrorism. Risen began his career as a reporter at the Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, and later worked at the Miami Herald, the Detroit Free Press, and the Los Angeles Times. He joined the New York Times in 1998, and moved to The Intercept in the summer of 2017. He is the author of four books: “Wrath of Angels: The American Abortion War”; “The Main Enemy: The Inside Story of the CIA’s Final Showdown With the KGB”; “State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration”; and “Pay Any Price: Greed, Power and Endless War.”

Derek Hawkins, cybersecurity policy reporter, The Washington Post
Derek Hawkins, a cybersecurity policy reporter at The Washington Post, launched a weekday newsletter called The Cybersecurity 202 for The Post in May. He previously reported for The Post's Morning Mix, where he covered law, crime, politics and breaking news. Hawkins also spent a year working on The Post’s Investigative and Metro desks through American University’s graduate program. He covered the trials of the officers charged in Freddie Gray’s arrest and death, and a triple murder case against members of the street gang MS-13. He also spent several months investigating search warrant practices by D.C. law enforcement, and contributed to The Post’s 2015 and 2016 series on fatal shootings by police. Before joining The Post, Derek covered federal courts and policy for Law360 and dabbled briefly in radio production.


Shooting the Messenger: The Whistleblower Project

Saturday, Sept. 29, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Today, whistleblowers and those that reveal government secrets are under attack by politicians, the public and the very people whose wrongdoing they expose. They risk their lives and careers to reveal the truth. During Sunshine Week this year, the Society of Professional Journalists' Freedom of Information Committee teamed up with the Government Accountability Project and released the Whistleblower Project, which told the stories of public servants that helped shed light on corruption and government waste, how reporters can work with them and how they are currently protected by a patchwork of laws, but ultimately are still vulnerable to reprisal.

Moderator: Danielle McLean, investigative reporter, ThinkProgress

Speakers: Dana Gold, director of education, Government Acccountability Project; James Risen, director, Press Freedom Defense Fund; James Kidney, former assistant chief litigation counsel, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission

Click for speaker information


Danielle McLean, investigative reporter, ThinkProgress
Danielle McLean (@DanielleBMcLean) is the chairperson of SPJ’s Freedom of Information Committee and an investigative reporter for ThinkProgress. She is a past president of SPJ’s New England Chapter and the winner of the Maine Press Association’s political reporting award, and the New England Newspaper and Press Association’s government, transportation, business and economic, and courts and crime reporting awards.


Dana Gold, director of education, Government Acccountability Project
Dana Gold (@DanaLGold) is an attorney and currently serves as the Government Accountability Project’s director of education. Having represented whistleblowers for many years, she now leads public education initiatives and partners with diverse stakeholders to foster awareness of the essential role whistleblowers play in promoting government and corporate accountability.


James Risen, director, Press Freedom Defense Fund
James Risen serves as Director of the Press Freedom Defense Fund, which is dedicated to supporting news organizations, journalists, and whistleblowers in legal fights in which a substantial public interest, freedom of the press, or related human or civil right is at stake. Risen was himself a target of the U.S. government’s crackdown on journalists and whistleblowers. He waged a seven- year battle, risking jail, after the Bush and Obama administrations sought to force him to testify and reveal his confidential sources in a leak investigation. As a New York Times reporter, Risen won the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for his stories about the National Security Agency’s domestic spying program. He currently also serves as The Intercept’s Senior National Security Correspondent.

James Kidney, former assistant chief litigation counsel, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
James Kidney is the former Assistant Chief Litigation Counsel for the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, responsible for overseeing the agency's securities fraud litigation. Kidney litigated a number of insider trading cases for the SEC, including one against Big Four accounting firm KPMG. When retiring in 2014, Kidney blew the whistle on the SEC's failure to investigate large Wall Street banks after the 2008 financial crash. His experience was documented in the 2017 book by ProPublica reporter Jesse Eisenberg, The Chickenshit Club: Why the Justice Department Fails to Prosecute Executives.


Censorship by PIO: Challenging gag orders on news sources

Saturday, Sept. 29, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Policies forbidding employees from unapproved communications with journalists are being enforced with increasing aggressiveness, but they are almost certainly unconstitutional in the government workplace and they may well violate federal labor laws in the private sector. We'll exchange ideas about the severity of the "censorship by PIO" problem and strategies for navigating roadblocks to get access to newsmakers.

Speakers: Frank LoMonte, director, The Brechner Center for Freedom of Information; Carolyn Carlson, former SPJ national president and recently retired journalism professor at Kennesaw State University

Click for speaker information


Frank LoMonte, director, The Brechner Center for Freedom of Information
Frank LoMonte is a professor of media law and director of the Brechner Center for Freedom of Information at the University of Florida, where he leads a team of researchers incubating programs that make information more accessible and actionable for journalists and all citizens. Prior to his time there, he served as the executive director of the Student Press Law Center (SPLC) in Washington, D.C., where he launched a number of major programming initiatives, including the “New Voices” movement, building youth-led grassroots organizations to pass laws protecting students' free-expression rights. Before becoming an attorney, he was an investigative journalist and political columnist for daily newspapers in Florida and Georgia.

Carolyn Carlson, former SPJ national president and recently retired journalism professor at Kennesaw State University
Carolyn Carlson is a member of the SPJ FOI Committee, a Wells Key holder, a past national SPJ president, and recently retired director of the journalism program at Kennesaw State University in Georgia. From 2012 to 2017, for SPJ’s Sunshine Week contributions, she conducted seven surveys of reporters and PIOs, documenting the tensions in their relationships.


Unleash and focus your inner broadcaster

Saturday, Sept. 29, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Finding your voice for radio, television or even podcasting isn't always easy. In this session, you'll learn techniques to deliver copy in a clear, conversational manner and more effectively communicate with your audience. You'll also learn how to stay focused and “in the moment” with every story you read. We'll have scripts to help you unleash your inner broadcaster.

NOTE: While this session is great way for existing and aspiring broadcasters to develop stronger vocal ability, it's also a great way for newsroom managers to learn new techniques for coaching their own staffs.

Speakers: George Bodarky, news and public affairs director, WFUV-FM; Amy Tardif, regional manager, StoryCorps’ Chicago StoryBooth; Tracy Davidson, morning anchor, NBC10 News Today in Philadelphia

Click for speaker information


George Bodarky, news and public affairs director, WFUV-FM
George Bodarky is the news and public affairs director at WFUV FM, an NPR affiliate station, based on the Rose Hill campus of Fordham University in the Bronx. He has been with WFUV for 17 years. Bodarky is second vice president of the New York State Associated Press Association and a past president and current board member of Public Radio News Directors Inc. He also serves on the board for the Deadline Club in NYC. He is an award-winning journalist who trains undergraduate and graduate students at Fordham in multi-platform journalism. Bodarky also teaches at CUNY's Graduate School of Journalism and has taught at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. He is widely known for his vocal coaching and journalism training. Over the years, his students have won countless awards and have secured employment as anchors, reporters, writers and producers in commercial and public television and radio outlets across the nation. Prior to working at WFUV, Bodarky spent many years as an anchor, reporter and news manager in commercial radio and television.

Amy Tardif, regional manager, StoryCorps’ Chicago StoryBooth
Amy Tardif is the Regional Manager of StoryCorps’ Chicago StoryBooth. She was formerly WGCU-FM Public Media’s Station Manager and News Director in Fort Myers, FL, where she won a Peabody award for her audio documentary Lucia's Letter on human trafficking. She was the first woman in radio (and only the fourth woman) to Chair RTDNA in 2014. She served on the Public Radio News Director’s (PRNDI) Board from 2007-2012. Tardif was managing editor for NPR's Next Generation Radio Project twice. She was PIO for the Fort Myers Police Department, a reporter and anchor for TV stations in Fort Myers and Austin, MN and reported for WUSF Public Radio in Tampa.

Tracy Davidson, morning anchor, NBC10 News Today in Philadelphia
11-time Emmy-winning journalist Tracy Davidson is a morning anchor for NBC10 News Today in Philadelphia. Tracy joined NBC10 in March 1996 and has served as both an anchor and consumer reporter. She loves presenting the day’s top stories with her co-anchor, Vai Sikahema, and helping viewers prepare for their day. Tracy’s Emmy Awards, include the Best News Anchor Emmy for the Mid-Atlantic Region in 2008 and 2013 and Best Morning Show three years in a row. In 2013, Temple University honored Tracy with the Lew Klein Alumni in Media Award. She was recognized with Pennsylvania’s Most Powerful and Influential Women Award by the National and Pennsylvania Diversity Council. In 2014, she was inducted into Philadelphia’s Broadcast Pioneers Hall of Fame. In 2017, Tracy was awarded with the “Hero Award” from Montgomery Child Advocacy project. She has represented the station at hundreds of community and charity events throughout the Greater Philadelphia area.


6 Weeks To Go: How you can win with your election coverage

Saturday, Sept. 29, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

The midterm elections will take place 39 days after EIJ18 opens in Baltimore. As the attendees gather for three days of valuable training, the political campaigns will be shifting into high gear. Even with 39 days to go, news managers can still take steps which will help their operations own the coverage and provide valuable journalism to their news consumers. Come to this topical session which will set every news manager up to be successful in November and beyond.

Speakers: Triston V. Sanders, consultant, Magid; Scott Diener, news director, KMOV-TV; Lauren Mayk, reporter, NBC10 News; Blake Hounshell, editor in chief, POLITICO Magazine

Click for speaker information


Triston V. Sanders, consultant, Magid
Triston Sanders (@tvsanders) is a Consultant for Magid, a strategy and research company. She brings over 25 years of journalism experience to the company.

Triston most recently served as Executive News Director at KENS-TV in San Antonio, Texas. She also worked as the Assistant News Director at WWL-TV in New Orleans, and prior to that served as News Director for WCTV in Florida’s capital. In her time in Tallahassee, she was a teacher at Florida State University for six years while also serving as Executive Producer and Anchor.

Prior to serving as a news manager, Triston worked as an anchor/reporter at WINK-TV in Fort Myers, a reporter at WWSB-TV in Sarasota, and as a producer at WFLA in Tampa, WSVN in Miami, and WPBF in West Palm Beach.

Scott Diener, news director, KMOV-TV
Scott Diener is the award-winning news director for St. Louis’ KMOV-TV (CBS affiliate and Meredith ownership), the news operation with the most watched local newscast in Missouri and the fastest growing digital operation in the region. KMOV-TV is frequently recognized for having the highest rated late news in the nation. Diener has more than three decades experience as a reporter, photographer, producer, digital journalist and news manager. Besides St. Louis, Scott has served as a news director in Los Angeles, Dallas, San Francisco, Phoenix, Cincinnati and Louisville. Scott currently serves as the Region 5 Director (Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa) for the Radio Television Digital News Association. Scott’s career highlights include a George Foster Peabody Award and Alfred I DuPont Columbia Award for investigative journalism plus numerous regional Emmy and Edward R. Murrow Awards. California State University of Northridge honored Scott by naming him to its Commerce of Creativity Distinguished Speaker Series — recognizing him for his “significant contributions to the art of communications.” Scott is a proud graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

Lauren Mayk, reporter, NBC10 News
Lauren Mayk (@laurenjmayk) is a reporter for NBC10 News. You can watch her live reports weekdays during the 4, 5, and 6 p.m. newscasts.

Lauren covers a variety of assignments for NBC10 but is most passionate about reporting on politics. Her most memorable time as a reporter has been the entire 2016 election season. Lauren interviewed all four of the major candidates for President and Vice President (Clinton, Kaine, Trump and Pence). Bringing viewers an up-close look at the campaigns, reporting from the convention floors at the RNC and DNC, hearing for supporters at rallies about what inspired them to support their candidates is something she will never forget.

Lauren loves reporting and living in the Philadelphia region.

“This region has special meaning to me and to my family,” said Mayk. “I was born here, while my father was working at WCAU as a reporter! I returned after college to work at the Philadelphia Inquirer, and was thrilled to return again to join the NBC10 team.”

Prior to joining NBC10, Lauren graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in Political Science. During her time as an undergraduate, she served as the Editor In Chief for The Michigan Daily. She then went on to work for the Philadelphia Inquirer as a South Jersey correspondent. She then worked as a business reporter at The Sarasota Herald-Tribune. After spending time working on the newspaper side, Lauren then worked as a television news anchor (morning, then evening) for cable station SNN in Sarasota, Florida, before moving to Tampa to work at WFLA where she covered politics as well as consumer issues and investigative stories.

Blake Hounshell, editor in chief, POLITICO Magazine
Blake Hounshell is editor in chief of POLITICO Magazine. He was formerly editorial director of POLITICO.com, overseeing the publication’s digital operations.

Before joining POLITICO in June 2013, Blake was managing editor of Foreign Policy, which was nominated for 10 National Magazine Awards during his tenure. In 2011, he was a finalist for the Livingston Awards for Young Journalists for his reporting on the Arab uprisings, and his Twitter feed was named one of Time magazine's 140 Best Twitter Feeds of 2011. Under his leadership, Passport, FP's flagship blog, won Media Industry Newsletter's Best of the Web award in 2008. With Elizabeth Dickinson, he edited “Southern Tiger: Chile's Fight for a Democratic and Prosperous Future,” the memoirs of former Chilean President Ricardo Lagos, published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2012.

A graduate of Yale University, Blake speaks mangled Arabic and French and lives in Washington with his wife and two children.


The Decline of International News Reporting in the U.S.

Saturday, Sept. 29, 1:30-3 p.m.

Each year international story counts have been in decline in the U.S. What are the causes and consequences? What can we as journalists do to promote and maintain a more global view?

Moderator: Erik Kirschbaum, executive director, RIAS Berlin Commission

Panelists: Michael Gargiulo, anchor, NBC 4 New York; Ralph Begleiter, Founding Director, Center for Political Communication and former correspondent, CNN; Jeff Mason, reporter and White House correspondent, Reuters; Stacey Samuel, supervising editor, NPR; Teri Schultz, international reporter covering the European Union

Click for speaker information


Erik Kirschbaum, executive director, RIAS Berlin Commission
Erik is a native of New York City, but has livedand worked as a reporter and writer in Germany for more than thirty years. He is currently the Executive Director of RIAS Berlln Kommisson.

Erik has worked as a correspondent for the Reuters international news agency is also a non-fiction author. Based in Berlin since 1993. He has written about entertainment, politics, sports, economics, renewable energy as well as disasters, earthquakes and climate change in nearly thirty countries in Europe and North America. Erik currently writes for the Los Angeles times among others major new outlets.

Michael Gargiulo, anchor, NBC 4 New York
Emmy-award winning journalist Michael Gargiulo is co-anchor of NBC 4 New York’s "Today in New York" on weekday mornings.

Michael has a special interest in military affairs and earned an Emmy award for his reporting from Iraq and Kuwait. He also was one of the last reporters to be embedded with a U.S. military unit in Afghanistan before the end of combat operations there.

A native New Yorker, Gargiulo began his career at WSAZ-TV in Huntington, West Virginia. He moved on to WYOU in Scranton, WLKY in Louisville, KSTP in Minneapolis, Hearst Argyle Washington Bureau, and WTTG in Washington before coming home to New York and WNBC in 2006.

Ralph Begleiter, Founding Director, Center for Political Communication and former correspondent, CNN
Ralph Begleiter is of CNN’s most widely traveled reporters, covering five U.S. Secretaries of State and three Presidents. During the 1980s and 1990s, when CNN was the world’s only global, all-news television channel, he covered U.S. diplomacy, interviewed countless world leaders, hosted the public affairs program “Global View,” and co-anchored CNN’s “International Hour.” Later, he hosted the nationally broadcast PBS program “Great Decisions.” He has worked in 100 countries on all 7 continents, including taking university students to Cuba, South America, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and Antarctica. He served as a RIAS program judge, and later a Board member for several years in the 1990s.

During nearly twenty years at the University of Delaware, he was founding Director of the Center for Political Communication, and brought his broadcast journalism experience to his award-winning instruction in communication, journalism, and political science.

He earned his Honors B.A. in political science at Brown University and his M.S. in journalism at Columbia.

Jeff Mason, reporter and White House correspondent, Reuters
Jeff Mason is a White House Correspondent for Reuters and the 2016-2017 president of the White House Correspondents’ Association. He was the lead Reuters correspondent for President Barack Obama's 2012 campaign and interviewed the president at the White House in 2015. Jeff has been based in Washington since 2008, when he covered the historic race between Obama, Hillary Clinton and John McCain. Jeff started his career in Frankfurt, Germany, where he covered the airline industry before moving to Brussels, Belgium, where he covered the European Union. He is a Colorado native, proud graduate of Northwestern University and former Fulbright scholar.

Stacey Samuel, supervising editor, NPR
A reporter and producer with over 20 years of experience, now Stacey Samuel currently serves as supervising editor for National Public Radio overseeing coverage of international and breaking news for Morning Edition and NPR.org. Before radio, Stacey covered politics, national security and the Supreme Court for CNN, where she was part of the team that won an Emmy for the coverage of the 2012 U.S. presidential elections. She also has field produced for CBS Evening News and CBS This Morning. Her reporting experience includes reporting on education for an ABC affiliate in Florida.

Stacey has taught journalism at the University of Florida’s College of Journalism and frequently speaks about journalism to university students. She has a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University and an undergraduate degree in French and economics from Wesleyan University.

Teri Schultz, international reporter covering the European Union
Teri Schultz has been covering the European Union, NATO and the BeNeLux region since 2007, reporting regularly for National Public Radio, CBS radio and Germany's public broadcaster, Deutsche Welle. Schultz has made six reporting trips to Afghanistan and been a journalism fellow in Russia and Pakistan, as well as a RIAS fellow. Prior to moving to Brussels, Schultz covered the US State Department for more than six years, traveling throughout the world with Secretary of State Colin Powell. Schultz began her international career with a reporting job in Helsinki, Finland shortly after graduating with a journalism degree from New Mexico State University. She arrived just before the fall of the Berlin Wall and was witness to the transformation of Europe, reporting from the occupied Baltic States as they regained their independence from the crumbling Soviet Union. She holds a Master of Science in International Relations from the University of Helsinki.


[ Jump to: News Management | Newsgathering | Digital | Career Development | Sponsored ]


Digital

These sessions will give attendees access to some of the newest and best tools being used in the industry. Programs will cover all levels of digital skills, from beginner to advanced, giving everybody the skills they need to improve their digital game.


Don't learn the hard way: Perfecting your Podcast

Thursday, Sept. 27, 1-2 p.m.

After the success of journalistic podcasts such as Accused and Breakdown, more and more reporters are venturing into podcasting. This session will highlight what creators of such podcasts have learned the hard way and provide tips on pitching audio stories for old-school bosses who aren't as embracing of the format.

Speakers: Amber Hunt, New York Times bestselling author; Amanda Rossmann, photojournalist, Cincinnati Enquirer

Click for speaker information


Amber Hunt, New York Times bestselling author
Amber Hunt is a New York Times bestselling author whose titles include “The Kennedy Wives: Triumph and Tragedy in America’s Most Public Family” (Lyons Press, 2015) and “See How Much You Love Me” (St. Martin’s Press, 2014). She helped report the Enquirer’s 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning project Seven Days of Heroin, is a past University of Michigan Knight-Wallace Fellow and co-creator and host of the hit podcast “Accused,” which reached No. 1 on the Apple Podcast charts.

Amanda Rossmann, photojournalist, Cincinnati Enquirer
Amanda Rossmann is an Emmy-award winning photojournalist with the Cincinnati Enquirer. A graduate of Northern Kentucky University, she has worked for The Enquirer for over 10 years. Her video “Big Man on Campus” was awarded an Emmy by the Ohio Valley Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences and she was a part of the team that produced the Enquirer's 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning project Seven Days of Heroin.


Al’s Cool Tools

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2:30-3:30 p.m.

At every convention you hope for one session that will teach you something you can take back to your newsroom and spread the word. This may be it. Poynter’s Al Tompkins will show you how to use your phone or tablet to accomplish all sorts of things that once required hours of work. You will see how to create interactive graphics and videos, how to build before and after sliders and the coolest new ways to transcribe interviews without typing a word. Al will show you how to start with just a name and within two minutes track that person down, even see the patio furniture on their back porch without ever meeting the person and without spending a dime. Bring your phone and log on to the wireless network so you can play along.

Speaker: Al Tompkins, senior faculty for broadcasting and online, The Poynter Institute

Click for speaker information


Al Tompkins, senior faculty for broadcasting and online, The Poynter Institute
Al Tompkins is The Poynter Institute’s senior faculty for broadcasting and online. For almost 10 years, thousands of people a day read his online journalism story idea column “Al’s Morning Meeting” on Poynter.org.

Tompkins is the author of the book “Aim For The Heart: A Guide for TV Producers and Reporters,” which was adopted by more than 75 universities as their main broadcast writing textbook.

He co-authored four editions of the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation’s “Newsroom Ethics” workbook. Tompkins joined Poynter’s faculty from his job as news director at WSMV-TV in Nashville, Tenn. For 24 years, he worked as a photojournalist, reporter, producer, anchor, assistant news director, special projects/investigations director, documentary producer and news director.

Tompkins has trained thousands of television news producers, reporters, photojournalists and managers in his One-Day Storytelling Workshops in 45 states, Canada, Denmark, Iceland and South Africa. He has taught and coached print newsrooms in the U.S. and abroad how to build interactive news websites, how to use video more effectively online and how to manage ethical issues that arise online.


Digital Dirty Dozen

Friday, Sept. 28, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

This highly successful workshop began at EIJ14 and since then 12,000 journalists have viewed it online or in person. We've updated, upgraded and we're back with a new lineup of the best apps and programs to make your journalism heaven on earth.

Speaker: Kevin Z. Smith, director, Kiplinger Program in Public Affairs Journalism

Click for speaker information


Kevin Z. Smith, director, Kiplinger Program in Public Affairs Journalism
Kevin Z. Smith (@ethicsmith, @KipProgram) is the executive director of the Kiplinger Program in Public Affairs Journalism at Ohio University. He has been with Kiplinger since 2013 traveling the globe training journalists in digital media and ethics. He spent 14 years in newsrooms as a reporter and editor before a 13-year stint as a college professor. He is a former president of SPJ and served as its national ethics chair for several years.


Google News Initiative: Verification & Fact Checking | Safety & Security for Elections and Beyond

Friday, Sept. 28, 3-4 p.m.

"Attend this dual topic sessions to hear about how Google is helping to stem the tide of misinformation and increasing the integrity of information. You'll learn about the Trust Project and Fact Check Tags, and also get hands on with tools you can use immediately such as Reverse Image Search and Google Earth to help verify where news happens. We'll also ensure all attendees know how to protect yourself and your news organization from hacking, digital attacks and censorship. We'll cover 2-step authentication and Password Alert and teach additional tips to keep safe and secure in a digital world. More info: https://newsinitiative.withgoogle.com/google-news-lab"

Speakers: Nicholas Whitaker, training and development manager, Google News Lab

Click for speaker information


Nicholas Whitaker, training and development manager, Google News Lab
Nicholas Whitaker is the Training and Development Manager at the Google News Lab — a global team dedicated to working with journalists to provide training, collaborate on industry challenges, and support innovation in the newsroom. The News Lab forms part of the Google News Initiative, an effort to work with the news industry to help journalism thrive in the digital age.


Multiplying your reach in social media

Friday, Sept. 28, 3-4 p.m.

Social media is a significant investment of time and resources for journalists. In this session, come learn specific skills to multiply your efforts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other platforms, to grow your audience and engagement more quickly. Your trainers are a news manager/executive and a major-market anchor, both of whom are long-time passionate social media students and teachers. For 2018, a new focus on social-media live technologies will be added.

Speakers: Chip Mahaney, news director, WCPO-TV Cincinnati; Tracy Davidson, morning anchor, NBC10 News Today in Philadelphia

Click for speaker information


Chip Mahaney, news director, WCPO-TV Cincinnati
Chip Mahaney has nearly 40 years experience in news, primarily in television and digital, with 20 of those years in leadership positions at local and corporate levels. Chip is currently News Director at Scripps-flagship WCPO in Cincinnati. He has worked 10 years for Scripps, with most of that time in various digital roles at the company’s headquarters. Before coming to Scripps in 2008, Chip worked for local media organizations in the Fox, Raycom, Gannett and Belo groups.

Chip serves the journalism industry as a member of the RTDNA board of directors. He is a longtime judge of the annual Edward R. Murrow Awards. Chip has mentored dozens of developing journalists over the years, and he currently serves as a professional adviser to Ohio University's E.W. Scripps School of Journalism.

Tracy Davidson, morning anchor, NBC10 News Today in Philadelphia
11-time Emmy-winning journalist Tracy Davidson is a morning anchor for NBC10 News Today in Philadelphia. Tracy joined NBC10 in March 1996 and has served as both an anchor and consumer reporter. She loves presenting the day’s top stories with her co-anchor, Vai Sikahema, and helping viewers prepare for their day. Tracy’s Emmy Awards, include the Best News Anchor Emmy for the Mid-Atlantic Region in 2008 and 2013 and Best Morning Show three years in a row. In 2013, Temple University honored Tracy with the Lew Klein Alumni in Media Award. She was recognized with Pennsylvania’s Most Powerful and Influential Women Award by the National and Pennsylvania Diversity Council. In 2014, she was inducted into Philadelphia’s Broadcast Pioneers Hall of Fame. In 2017, Tracy was awarded with the “Hero Award” from Montgomery Child Advocacy project. She has represented the station at hundreds of community and charity events throughout the Greater Philadelphia area.


No Coding Needed: How to Build Decision-Making Interactives with PathChartr

Saturday, Sept. 29, 9-10 a.m.

Digital audiences seek personalized and pertinent information amid a deluge of news. But many newsrooms don’t have the resources — including coders — to deliver carefully tailored interactive presentations. That spurred the creation of PathChartr– a code-free tool that lets journalists quickly and easily build Q&A-driven interactive journeys. The goal: to offer information and insight that helps people navigate complex issues and make decisions. Join PathChartr creators Sandeep Junnarkar and Jere Hester for a session on how NBC News used this new, free drag-and-drop tool — and how you can, too.

Speakers: Sandeep Junnarkar, director of interactive journalism, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY; Jere Hester, director of news products and projects/director of reporting and writing, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY; Andrew W. Lehren, senior editor, NBC News investigations team

Click for speaker information


Sandeep Junnarkar, director of interactive journalism, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY
Sandeep Junnarkar is Director of the Interactive Journalism Program at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. He is the former New York bureau chief of CNET News.com, and has specialized in writing about technologies used in different industries. Junnarkar helped to create online editions of The New York Times, working as breaking news editor, writer, and Web producer when the paper went live on the Internet as The New York Times on the Web. Junnarkar, founder and editorial director of www.livesinfocus.org, a site that covers underreported issues, also served president of the South Asian Journalists Association from 2008 to 2010.

Jere Hester, director of news products and projects/director of reporting and writing, Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at CUNY
Jere Hester is Director of News Products and Projects and the Director of the Reporting and Writing Program at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. He joined the J-School in 2006 as the founding director of the award-winning NYCity News Service, which feeds student work to professional outlets. Hester was previously city editor of the NY Daily News, where he started as a reporter in 1992. Since 2009, he has written a pop culture column for NBC local sites, and is the author of “Raising a Beatle Baby: How John, Paul, George and Ringo Helped us Come Together as a Family.”

Andrew W. Lehren, senior editor, NBC News investigations team
Andrew W. Lehren (@lehrennbc) is a senior editor on the NBC News investigations team. Previously, he worked at The New York Times, where he was one of the paper’s lead reporters analyzing Wikileaks documents. He also contributed to the Pulitzer Prize-winning series that examined substandard Chinese chemicals tainting U.S. pharmaceuticals. Lehren has won numerous awards, including a Polk, Peabody, two duPont-Columbia batons and Edward R. Murrow investigative awards, Emmys, three Investigative Reporters & Editors awards, an Overseas Press Club honor, and a Daniel Pearl investigative award. His investigative reporting class at CUNY has also won the IRE award for best student investigation.


How radio and podcasting in Baltimore are changing the conversation on disabilities

Saturday, Sept. 29, 9-10 a.m.

This panel will discuss a radio show about disability that is broadcast on a station in Baltimore, as well as being streamed online, a podcast from Special Olympics Maryland, social media activism from the disability community, and news media representations of people with disabilities.

Speakers: Michael Gerlach, creator/host, INSIGHT ON disABILITY; Beth Haller, professor of journalism/new media, Towson University; Adam Hays, multimedia & digital coordinator, Special Olympics Maryland; Jason Schriml, VP, communications and brand management, Special Olympics Maryland; Lydia Timmins, Ph.D., assistant professor, University of Delaware

Click for speaker information


Michael Gerlach, creator/host, INSIGHT ON disABILITY
Michael Gerlach is the Executive producer and Host of INSIGHT ON disABILITY. His visual impairment, along with observing that there was a need for this type of resource around the country, have been the driving forces behind this unique concept since 2011. He has worked hard to ensure that the disabled community has an outlet from which to have its voice heard. Upon becoming an avid volunteer with Special Olympics Maryland, he helped develop "Brave In the Attempt Maryland", a podcast which shows that these athletes are more than just a donation and are an integral part of the community.

Lydia Timmins, Ph.D., assistant professor, University of Delaware
Dr. Lydia Timmins is a news media professional who brings her experience into the classroom. She spent 22 years working in broadcast and cable news. She has held positions on and off camera. Her main calling was producing, both line and field. Since leaving news full-time, she also periodically goes back to the newsroom to hone her skills. Currently, she teaches communication and journalism at the University of Delaware. She also teaches in the graduate program for TV Management at Drexel University. Timmins is a higher education columnist for RTDNA (Radio-Television Digital News Association) as well as the organization’s coordinator for the state of Delaware. She serves as the News Division Chair for BEA (Broadcast Education Association). She is active in the Delaware Press Association, and runs the High School Communications Contest.

Adam Hays, multimedia & digital coordinator, Special Olympics Maryland
Adam Hays is a Special Olympian in cycling and Multimedia & Digital Coordinator at Special Olympics Maryland and co-host of the Brave in the Attempt podcast.






Jason Schriml, VP, communications and brand management, Special Olympics Maryland
Jason Schriml has worked at Special Olympics Maryland for 20 years and in the field of intellectual advisability for over 35 years. He is currently VP of Communications at Special Olympics Maryland helping lead the athlete leadership program.




Beth Haller, professor of journalism/new media, Towson University
Beth Haller is Professor of Journalism/New Media in the Department of Mass Communication at Towson University in Maryland. She is the author of Representing Disability in an Ableist World: Essays on Mass Media (Advocado Press, 2010) and has been researching disability images in the media since 1990.


Facebook for News

Saturday, Sept. 29, 9-10 a.m.

SPJ trainer Lynn Walsh will share products and tools — including Live, Groups, Creators app and CrowdTangle — that help journalists leverage Facebook and Instagram for news gathering, storytelling and connecting with their followers.

Speaker: Lynn Walsh, project manager, Trusting News Project

Click for speaker information


Lynn Walsh, project manager, Trusting News Project
Lynn Walsh is an Emmy award-winning journalist who has worked in investigative, data and TV journalism at the national level as well as locally in California, Ohio, Texas and Florida. Currently, she is the Project Manager for the Trusting News project, where she works to help rebuild trust between journalists and the public by working with newsrooms to be more transparent about how they do their jobs. She is a digital explorer and an international speaker and trainer, working to encourage transparency, media engagement, digital innovation and free expression rights for all.


Phone photography in the newsroom: Gimmick or the future?

Saturday, Sept. 29, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Filmmakers have not only embraced shooting with a phone, they have found new, creative freedom with it. They're not having to work under the normal restraints of video production. Why haven't newsrooms found the same endless possibilities? The session will show how a top-5 market has integrated phonography both in day turns and with half-hour specials.

Speaker: Mike Castellucci, Phoning it in Creator/Professor of Practice, Michigan State University

Click for speaker information


Mike Castellucci, Phoning it in Creator/Professor of Practice, Michigan State University
Mike's innovative work with his iPhone has grabbed attention around the world, from professionals to professors, who want to know Mike's secret. In a broadcast television first, Mike shot an entire half hour special on his iPhone called Phoning it in. The show earned him the Edward R. Murrow award and two Emmy Awards. Mike has since followed that groundbreaking show with a 2nd and 3rd Phoning it in. In both instances, Mike not only shot them entirely on his phone, but also acted as producer, writer, and editor. Mike feels passionate about storytelling and says doing it with an iPhone simply illustrates that engaging storytelling can be accomplished with proper planning and knowing the abilities and constraints of the camera.

Cameras change, editing tools evolve, but one of the most important aspects of this business must never change—good storytelling. My goal is to air stories with poignancy and often humor, inspirational and unique stories. I like to call them snapshots from the human condition.


[ Jump to: News Management | Newsgathering | Digital | Career Development | Sponsored ]


Career Development

Fresh out of college? Ready to move up in your organization? Interested in moving into the classroom? These sessions will give you tips and tricks to make an important career move, whether you are just starting out in the industry or you’ve been here for decades.


How NOT to Get a Job: 10 Ways You're Killing Yourself in Your Job Hunt

Thursday, Sept. 27, 1-2 p.m.

You wouldn't believe some of the things jobseekers do that scuttle any chance they have of getting an interview, much less a job. In this snarky, entertaining twist of a perennially-relevant topic, you'll come away knowing the "gotchas" to avoid so you can better "getcha" next job in journalism.

Speakers: Chip Mahaney, news director, WCPO-TV Cincinnati; Wendy Wilk, Washington D.C. bureau chief, Hearst Television

Click for speaker information


Chip Mahaney and Wendy Wilk
Many, many years ago, Chip and Wendy started their careers in the same Tulsa newsroom, and together they learned many of the life/career lessons they'll share in this session. While they worked together only a short time, the friendship they built then has lasted their entire careers, even as they've lived in different cities and worked for different companies. Chip is the News Director at WCPO in Cincinnati. Wendy is Washington Bureau Chief for Hearst Television. Separately, they are married to great spouses and have wildly brilliant children. Together, they love baseball and laughing about everything else.


Freelancing and your Finances: How to stay ahead in today's market

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2:30-3:30 p.m.

Succeeding as a freelance journalist is a continuing challenge, particularly this year, with new tax laws and a constantly evolving business climate affecting publishing outlets and the potential for income. How will you increase your competitive edge and respond to news industry consolidation?

Speakers: Hazel Becker, freelance business writer and editor; Ruth E. Thaler-Carter, freelance journalist; Bob Sullivan, author and freelance journalist

Click for speaker information


Hazel Becker, freelance business writer and editor
Hazel Becker is a retired freelance business writer and editor specializing in analytical and data-rich articles for niche publications. She has extensive experience covering complex subjects and a talent for targeting publications to specific audiences. Her writing is enriched by her background as a veteran journalist with BNA Inc. (now part of Bloomberg), a D.C.-area publisher of information about government and business.

She is an active member of SPJ’s Washington, D.C. Professional Chapter and a founding member of the SPJ Freelance Community. She serves the Freelance Community as resources coordinator and served previously as chair of its executive leadership group.

Ruth E. Thaler-Carter, freelance journalist
Ruth E. Thaler-Carter has been published in the Washington Post, Baltimore Business Journal, Baltimore Sun, and Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, as well as dozens of association and not-for-profit magazines, newspapers, and websites. She is well-known for her networking and association activities as a longtime SPJ member, a founding member of the National Writers Union, and a national newsletter editor for the Editorial Freelancers Association. A Ford Fellow in the graduate journalism program at the University of Missouri-Columbia, she is the founder/owner of Communication Central and editor-in-chief of the An American Editor blog.

Bob Sullivan, author and freelance journalist
Bob Sullivan is a veteran journalist and author of four books, including the 2008 New York Times Best-Seller Gotcha Capitalism and the 2010 New York Times Best Seller, Stop Getting Ripped Off! He has won the Society of Professional Journalists Public Service Award, a Peabody award, and the Consumer Federation of America Betty Furness Consumer Media Service Award. A syndicated columnist, he co-hosts the podcast Breach, which examines history’s biggest hacking stories.

He holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri and is on the advisory board of the University of Georgia journalism school’s Cox Institute for Media Innovation.


Power Shift: Power to the newbies

Friday, Sept. 28, 9:15-10:15 a.m.

Learn what employers and educators need to know to ensure a safe, supportive workplace environment for some of the most vulnerable in the newsroom: newbies, including interns and new employees. The youngest and least powerful members of newsrooms are often targets of sexual harassment in the workplace. Young journalists need the tools to start their careers in safe, supportive workplaces, and supervisors need the skills and processes to create a culture of trust and integrity. Jill Geisler will share tips and lessons from the Freedom Forum Institute’s Power Shift Project to keep newbies successful and safe.

Speaker: Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago

Click for speaker information


Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago
Jill Geisler (@JillGeisler) is the Bill Plante Chair in Leadership and Media Integrity at Loyola University Chicago and a respected voice on newsroom management and ethics. She teaches and coaches in news organizations worldwide. In 2018, she was named the Freedom Forum Institute Fellow in Women’s Leadership and leads its Power Shift Project, the Newseum’s groundbreaking program to eradicate harassment and discrimination in media workplaces.

She is the author of “Work Happy: What Great Bosses Know,” produces the podcast “Q&A: Leadership and Integrity in the Digital Age,” and writes a monthly management column for the Columbia Journalism Review. Previously, she headed the leadership and management programs of the Poynter Institute and was among the country’s first female TV news directors. She’s been inducted to multiple media halls of fame and is the recipient of RTDNA’s Oldfield Distinguished Service award.


Perfecting your pitch and filling your assignment calendar

Friday, Sept. 28, 9:15-10:15 a.m.

Pitching isn’t art — or science. It’s business. It’s making your living by making the right pitches to the right clients at the right time. Find out how to vet publications before taking them on as clients. Learn how to make your pitch stand out from the competition. Get the editor’s perspective. Bring a pitch to discuss!

Speakers: Stephenie Overman, freelance journalist; Terena Bell, independent news and feature journalist

Click for speaker information


Stephenie Overman, freelance journalist
Stephenie Overman is a freelance journalist who specializes in workplace and health-care issues. She’s written for Fortune.com, Virginia Business, the Los Angeles Business Journal, Washington Post Express, Daily Labor Report, People Management magazine, Medical Economics and Employee Benefit News. She was editor of Staffing Management and Executive Talent magazines and was senior writer for HR Magazine. She’s author of “Next-Generation Wellness at Work” (Praeger Publishing, an Imprint of ABC-CLIO). She is the events coordinator for the SPJ Freelance Community.

Terena Bell, independent news and feature journalist
Terena Bell is an independent news and feature journalist who is currently reporting on tech/AI/business, health (ADHD, sex, & allergies), language/translation, and Kentucky. She is the 2018 winner of the,American Society for Journalists and Authors Arlene Eisenberg Award for an Article that Makes a Difference. Recent and pending outlets include Washington Post, The Atlantic, The Guardian, Fast Company, Marie Claire, U.S. News & World Report, the BBC, CIO, Vice, Successful Farming, The Intercept_, Discover, Astronomy Magazine and Quartz.


Nervous As Hell: Mock (or Maybe Real) Job Interviews

Friday, Sept. 28, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Journalism job interviews are rife with peculiarities you won't find by Googling, "journalism job interviews." Learn how to think like a hiring editor by sitting across from one. Michael Koretzky has been mired in middle management at a Top 50 newspaper and been EIC of media outlets you've never heard of — which means he's hired new grads most of his life because he's not important enough to hire Pulitzer winners. In front of everyone, do you have the guts to endure a mock (?) interview? Bring your resume to this interactive session or just learn from the carnage you'll witness. Because most new grads — and even old pros — suck at job interviews.

Speaker: Michael Koretzky, editor-in-chief, Debt.com

Click for speaker information


Michael Koretzky, editor-in-chief, Debt.com
Before Michael Koretzky (@koretzky ) was a personal finance writer and editor, he was fired from the South Florida Sun Sentinel (1997) and Florida Atlantic University (2010). Before that, he was expelled from Boca Raton Academy (1981) and the University of Florida (1989). He started and sold two magazines — one to the Tribune Company (1991), the other to the one-armed heir to the Listerine fortune (1999). Both quickly failed. Koretzky also copyedited and designed for the supermarket tabloids Globe, Star, Examiner, and National Enquirer (2002-2009). He's currently SPJ's longest-serving national board member, but only because he's run unopposed five times. He believes bios like this one should be journalistic and tell both sides of the story.


So you want to be a foreign correspondent...?

Friday, Sept. 28, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Covering foreign news is hazardous — and not just when you're in a war zone. Bureaucratic obstacles, know-nothing editors, shifting priorities and the need to survive on tight budgets all come into play. This panel reviews the realities, the changing nature of foreign news reporting, the rewards that await those who take the plunge — and the risky nature of the business.

Speakers: Kim Barker, foreign correspondent and author; Geoffrey Cain, correspondent and author; Jason Strother, freelance multimedia journalist; Jim Clancy, media trainer and former CNN correspondent; Donald Kirk, correspondent and author

Click for speaker information


Kim Barker, foreign correspondent and author
Kim Barker was the South Asia bureau chief for The Chicago Tribune from 2004 to 2009, based in New Delhi and Islamabad. Her book about those years, “The Taliban Shuffle: Strange Days in Afghanistan and Pakistan,” a dark comedic take on her time in South Asia, was published by Doubleday. The movie version, "Whiskey Tango Foxtrot," was released in March 2016, starring Tina Fey, Martin Freeman, Alfred Molina, Margot Robbie and Billy Bob Thornton.

Geoffrey Cain, correspondent and author
Geoffrey Cain is an author, writer and journalist in East Asia. He is the author of The Republic of Samsung, which will be published by Crown in 2019. His reporting and commentaries have appeared in The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, TIME, Foreign Policy, The New Republic, The Times of London, Far Eastern Economic Review, The Nation and academic journals and research studies and is a regular guest commentator on CNN, NPR, BBC and Bloomberg TV.



Jason Strother, freelance multimedia journalist
Reporter Jason Strother is a freelance multimedia journalist who's reported from both sides of the Korean peninsula since moving to Seoul in 2006.






Jim Clancy, media trainer and former CNN correspondent
Jim Clancy brings the experience of more than 30 years covering the world. He didn't just read about the collapse of Communism, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the siege of Beirut, the Rwanda Genocide, or all of the Iraq wars. He was there. His career includes reporting on the events that have shaped history over the last quarter century and his interviews with international personalities reads like a "Who's Who" of our times.

Donald Kirk, correspondent and author
Donald Kirk is a veteran correspondent and noted author on conflict and crisis from Southeast Asia to the Middle East to Northeast Asia.






Formulating the Future: #Press4Education

Friday, Sept. 28, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Earlier this year, SPJ reached out to K-12 classrooms across the country offering journalists as guest speakers through a new program #Press4Education, an idea from SPJ President Rebecca Baker and developed by the J-Ed Committee. What happened? What were the responses from teachers and journalists? Find out from the people who organized and lived it, plus what you can do to help in the future.

Moderator: Rebecca Tallent, University of Idaho

Panelists: Kym Fox, Texas State University; Mac McKerral, Western Kentucky University; Sarah J. Nichols, Journalism Education Association; Jeff South, Virginia Commonwealth University

Click for speaker information


Kym Fox, Texas State University
Kym Fox leads the journalism sequence in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Texas State University.She also serves as the graduate assistant coordinator. Fox moved from the newsroom to the classroom after spending 23 years as a daily journalist. She worked at the San Antonio ExpressNews as the deputy metro editor before joining the Texas State University faculty in 2002. Most of her 18 years at the paper she spent covering courts and legal affairs. Fox is an SPJ member and co-adviser to the Texas State student chapter. She is an active member of the San Antonio Chapter of SPJ and is a member of the SPJ national education committee.

Mac McKerral, Western Kentucky University
Professor Gordon D. “Mac” McKerral has served as Journalism Major coordinator in the School of Journalism & Broadcasting at Western Kentucky University since 2005. He has been a journalist and journalism educator since 1980 and has worked as a reporter, city editor, managing editor and editor at newspapers in Illinois, Florida, Indiana and New York. McKerral is the 2005 recipient of the Society of Professional Journalists’ Wells Key, SPJ’s highest honor, and a 1998 recipient of SPJ's National First Amendment Award. He has served as secretary-treasurer, president-elect, president and immediate past president of SPJ's national board. He is in his fourth consecutive term on the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation board of directors, SPJ’s supporting foundation.

Sarah J. Nichols, Journalism Education Association
Sarah Nichols teaches journalism and advises Whitney High Student Media, a comprehensive media program at Whitney High School in Rocklin, California. She serves as JEA’s vice president and is a member of its Scholastic Press Rights and Digital Media committees. In addition, Nichols coordinates the JEA Curriculum Initiative and the organization’s social media. She developed the JEA/NSPA Adviser Outreach Program (2015) and served on a team of teachertrainers for the program’s pilot in 2016.

Jeff South, Virginia Commonwealth University
After more than 20 years as a newspaper editor and reporter, Jeff South joined the faculty at the Richard T. Robertson School of Media and Culture at Virginia Commonwealth University. He directs the school’s Capital News Service program, in which undergraduate journalism students cover the General Assembly and other aspects of state government for news media throughout Virginia. From 1989 to mid-1997, South worked at the Austin AmericanStatesman — first as state editor, then as database editor. While serving as database editor, he developed a class in computer-assisted reporting at the University of Texas. South has since presented CAR seminars for the Society of Professional Journalists, the Associated Press, Investigative Reporters and Editors, Inc., and other groups.


What happens when women of color are silenced in the newsroom?

Friday, Sept. 28, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

In the current media landscape, the voices of women of color; their perspectives, and their experiences are often under-represented, and the specific nature of the threats they face, too often overlooked. The Committee to Protect Journalists will convene a panel that explores the intersectional threats that undermine women journalists of color. From Ilia Calderón, who received racially motivated death threats while on the job, to Melissa Harris Perry’s termination from MSNBC, the panel will examine some of the specific ways that gendered and racialized threats are used to intimidate, censor, and ultimately silence these integral voices.

Speakers: Juleyka Lantigua Williams, CEO, Lantigua Williams Co.; María Peña, vice president of print, National Association of Hispanic Journalists; Julia Craven, Reporter, HuffPost; Tracy Jarrett, Producer, Vice News Tonight on HBO; Nidhi Subbaraman, Science Reporter, BuzzFeed News

Click for speaker information


María Peña, vice president of print, National Association of Hispanic Journalists
Nicaraguan-born María Peña has lived in the United States since 1978, and she has worked as a bilingual journalist in Washington for close to 30 years.

She is the Washington correspondent for La Opinion/Impremedia, specializing in issues impacting the Latino community. Throughout her career, she has interviewed celebrities as well as local, state, national and international leaders. Maria is an active member of the White House Correspondents Association, and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.

Her work has gotten national recognition from the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and the National Association of Hispanic Publications (NAHP). Last year, she was listed by “El Tiempo Latino” among the “100 influential Latinos” in the DC area, and got a bronze award for coverage of the 2016 elections from the NAHP.

Juleyka Lantigua Williams, CEO, Lantigua Williams Co.
In 2017, Juleyka founded a production company, Lantigua Williams & Co., after 18+ years in media (NPR, The Atlantic, Random House). Its mission is to support and amplify the work of creators of color in digital audio and film. Currently an associate producer on "Sol de agosto (August Sun)," a short film that was shortlisted for the BAFTA Student Awards and is an official selection at the 2018 Palm Springs International ShortFest, the company is also a producer on the pilot for "Barry & Joe: The Animated Series," an adult time-travel adventure in which President Obama and VP Biden travel back in time to save the world.

Within months of launching, Lantigua-Williams & Co. was awarded a grant from the MacArthur Foundation to create a podcast (“70 Million) to chronicle criminal justice reform from the ground up around the country. Juleyka’s work as a multimedia journalist reached tens millions of people and appeared in The Houston Chronicle,The Miami Herald, The Chicago Tribune, and the L.A. Times, among dozens of national and local papers, and publications like JET, The Progressive, and Nieman Reports. Juleyka earned a masters in print journalism from Boston University and an MFA in creative writing from Goddard College. A Fulbright Scholar (Spain) and John Jay/Tow 2016 Criminal Justice Reporting Fellow, she volunteers as the communications director for TEDxFulbright. Lantigua-Williams has made inclusion a central theme in her life’s work, while endeavoring to fully understand her own experiences as a hyphenated American.

Tracy Jarrett, Producer, Vice News Tonight on HBO
Tracy Jarrett (@tejarrett) is an Emmy-nominated, Peabody award-winning producer covering politics and DC-based policy coverage for “VICE News Tonight,” the Emmy award-winning nightly newscast from VICE Media and HBO.

Before joining VICE News’ Washington DC bureau, Jarrett worked at NBC News contributing to shows including Dateline, Nightly News with Lester Holt, and the TODAY Show, as well as NBC News digital. Jarrett joined NBC after completing a GroundTruth-Kaiser Family Foundation reporting fellowship, where she traveled to South Africa to report on women and children living with HIV. She still works as an advisor for The GroundTruth Project.

Jarrett has participated in multiple international fellowships through the UN Foundation, International Reporting Project, and International Center for Journalists. She is a 2012 graduate of Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and a 2011 graduate of Amherst College.

In August 2017, Jarrett produced VICE News Tonight’s award-winning “Charlottesville: Race and Terror,” providing viewers with an unflinching insight into rally organizer Christopher Cantwell’s hotel hideaway outside of Virginia provided viewers and an unforgettable window on an American tragedy.

Nidhi Subbaraman, Science Reporter, BuzzFeed News
Nidhi Subbaraman (@NidhiSubs) is a science reporter at BuzzFeed News. She is interested in the roles of government agencies that monitor the environment and public health. Her reporting has taken her to South Dakota, to observe the federal health system serving Native Americans, to Tampa, to visit clinics offering banned treatments, and to Facebook, where fake medical claims proliferate unchecked.

Subbaraman joined the BuzzFeed News Washington D.C. bureau in 2016. Previously, she covered science and technology for the business desk at the The Boston Globe. Her work has also appeared in Fast Company, Nature, NBCNews.com, New Scientist, Scientific American, Spectrum, and elsewhere.

Julia Craven, Reporter, HuffPost
Julia Craven covers racism in America for HuffPost. Since joining HuffPost in 2015, Julia has dedicated herself to exposing the issues facing black Americans — including police violence, poverty, missing children, domestic violence and much more. She’s a proud Southerner and graduated from UNC Chapel Hill in 2014. Her work has also been published in USA TODAY.




Saving Student Media

Saturday, Sept. 29, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

The print advertising collapse that started gutting professional newsrooms a decade ago has finally begun crushing college media. Many college newspapers have trimmed their print schedules, as they have had to slash their newsroom budgets. Will it end the same sad way it has for the pros? Maybe not. Hear from students, advisers and pros who are trying novel ways to either delay the inevitable or even reverse the trend. You can even join their efforts for free.

Moderator: Mike Rizzo, assistant professor of mass communication, St. John's University

Panelists: Michael Koretzky, editor-in-chief, Debt.com; Jeff South, Virginia Commonwealth University; Ryan Romano, Diamondback, University of Maryland; Fadel Allassan, Commonwealth Times, Virginia Commonwealth University

Click for speaker information


Mike Rizzo, assistant professor of mass communication, St. John's University
Michael Rizzo, M.B.A., comes to St. John’s University as an industry assistant professor in the Division of Mass Communications. His M.B.A. is in marketing management from St. John’s University and he has a B.A. in communications from Fordham University.

Rizzo is a broadcast journalist teaching as an adjunct professor at St. John’s since 2006 and as an adjunct instructor at Montclair State University since 2013, all with a focus on trends in print, broadcast and multimedia writing, and journalism. Rizzo managed news and sports coverage at ABC-TV News and continues to consult there.

He is a former executive director at ABC News Radio, and managing editor at Fios1 News, and News 12.

Jeff South, Virginia Commonwealth University
After more than 20 years as a newspaper editor and reporter, Jeff South joined the faculty at the Richard T. Robertson School of Media and Culture at Virginia Commonwealth University. He directs the school’s Capital News Service program, in which undergraduate journalism students cover the General Assembly and other aspects of state government for news media throughout Virginia. From 1989 to mid-1997, South worked at the Austin AmericanStatesman — first as state editor, then as database editor. While serving as database editor, he developed a class in computer-assisted reporting at the University of Texas. South has since presented CAR seminars for the Society of Professional Journalists, the Associated Press, Investigative Reporters and Editors, Inc., and other groups.

Michael Koretzky, editor-in-chief, Debt.com
Before Michael Koretzky (@koretzky) was a personal finance writer and editor, he was fired from the South Florida Sun Sentinel (1997) and Florida Atlantic University (2010). Before that, he was expelled from Boca Raton Academy (1981) and the University of Florida (1989). He started and sold two magazines — one to the Tribune Company (1991), the other to the one-armed heir to the Listerine fortune (1999). Both quickly failed. Koretzky also copyedited and designed for the supermarket tabloids Globe, Star, Examiner, and National Enquirer (2002-2009). He's currently SPJ's longest-serving national board member, but only because he's run unopposed five times. He believes bios like this one should be journalistic and tell both sides of the story.

Fadel Allassan, Commonwealth Times, Virginia Commonwealth University
Fadel Allassan is a political science student at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, where he has served for more than four years on the staff of the student newspaper, The Commonwealth Times, as a writer and editor before taking on his current role as Special Projects Director. Fadel is also the News Director of VCU’s student radio station, WVCW. He has won more than 10 awards for his work from the Society of Professional Journalists, Virginia Press Association and VCU Student Media Center. Last summer, Fadel was an intern at CNN’s headquarters in Atlanta.

Ryan Romano, Diamondback, University of Maryland
Ryan Romano is the editor in chief of the University of Maryland's independent student newspaper, The Diamondback. Previously, he served as a copy editor, copy desk chief, deputy managing editor and assistant engagement editor for the paper. He's a senior journalism major with minors in Spanish and statistics, on track to graduate in May 2019.


[ Jump to: News Management | Newsgathering | Digital | Career Development | Sponsored ]


Sponsored Sessions

Through Earbuds: Investigative Journalism and Podcasts

Saturday, Sept. 29, 9-10 a.m.

Sponsored by the Knight Foundation

The list of investigative series delivered via “your favorite podcast app” is growing and changing, both in topics and producers. As broadcast and print newsrooms create high quality content that pulls audiences in, asks the important questions and - sometimes - leads to incredible action, it’s important to consider: Is serial podcasting giving investigative journalism new life in a changing digital space? And, has the popularity of these podcasts changed public’s interest in and hunger for investigative journalism? Join investigative podcasters in this food-for-thought discussion about their work, their communities and the unique challenges of working an investigative podcast.

Speakers: Amber Hunt, New York Times bestselling author; David Ridgen, filmmaker and broadcaster; Ju-Don Marshall, Chief Content Officer, WFAE; Nicole Vap, director of investigative journalism, 9NEWS Denver

Click for speaker information


Amber Hunt, New York Times bestselling author
Amber Hunt is a New York Times bestselling author whose titles include “The Kennedy Wives: Triumph and Tragedy in America’s Most Public Family” (Lyons Press, 2015) and “See How Much You Love Me” (St. Martin’s Press, 2014). She helped report the Enquirer’s 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning project Seven Days of Heroin, is a past University of Michigan Knight-Wallace Fellow and co-creator and host of the hit podcast “Accused,” which reached No. 1 on the Apple Podcast charts.

Ju-Don Marshall, Chief Content Officer, WFAE
Ju-Don Marshall (@jemarsha11) is the chief content officer of WFAE 90.7, the NPR station in Charlotte, North Carolina. Previously, she was executive editor and senior vice president at News Corporation, overseeing Beliefnet, and oversaw the digital newsroom at The Washington Post, where she worked for 17 years.



Nicole Vap, director of investigative journalism, 9NEWS Denver
Nicole Vap (@nicolevap), is the Director of Investigative Journalism at 9NEWS in Denver, and TEGNA Inc. Vap leads a team of award winning reporters and producers in Denver, and coordinates joint projects and training company wide. Her team are winners of a 2018 National Edward R. Murrow award, a 2017 Sigma Delta Chi Award for Public Service in Television Journalism, a 2011 DuPont Silver Baton for excellence in Broadcast journalism, multiple regional Edward R. Murrow and Emmy awards as well as being named a finalist for the IRE Freedom of Information award.

Nicole is a board member of IRE Investigative Reporters and Editors, and is Vice President of the board of the Colorado Freedom of Information Coalition. She has also worked at television stations in Arizona, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Kansas.

David Ridgen
Director David Ridgen is an award-winning filmmaker and writer who currently investigates and hosts Canada’s most successful podcast, the CBC’s Someone Knows Something. SKS has gone to number one in the USA, Canada, and Australia. Works by Ridgen have been credited with the reopening of cold cases and arrests, putting a Klansman behind bars for a civil rights era double murder, making progressive impact on the Israel/Palestine issue, and spurring victim reconciliation with perpetrators.


Free to FOIA

Thursday, Sept. 27, 9-10:30 a.m.

Sponsored by the Charles Koch Institute

The Freedom of Information Act has allowed journalism to shine a light on government for half a century. Even with today’s instant news cycle, FOIA has been the mechanism behind some blockbuster stories in the last few years. As a savvy reporter, how do you navigate FOIA for your benefit? How do you find the right information and isolate great stories? How do you avoid getting caught in the bureaucracy of FOIA? What are the secrets for ensuring your request is on top of the pile? Real-world journalists and experts provide a tactical and topical guide.

Speakers: Jesse Franzblau, policy analyst, Open the Government; Nell Greenfieldboyce, science and technology correspondent, NPR; Atty. Mark Bailen, media law specialist and partner, BakerHostetler

Click for speaker information


Jesse Franzblau, policy analyst, Open the Government
Jesse Franzblau (@JFranzblau) is a policy analyst and freedom of information advocate specializing in the use of transparency laws to document U.S. national security, surveillance and domestic law enforcement policies. Prior to joining OTG he worked as a consultant for the Open Society Justice Initiative, as an investigator for the Center for Justice and Accountability, and a researcher for the National Security Archive — promoting access to information and open government in the U.S. and abroad. He has written for a number of publications on U.S. foreign policy, government transparency and the intersection between freedom of information and human rights truth and justice efforts.

Nell Greenfieldboyce, science and technology correspondent, NPR
Nell Greenfieldboyce is a science correspondent at NPR, where she has worked since 2005. In that time Greenfieldboyce has reported on topics including the narwhals in Greenland, the ending of the space shuttle program, and the reasons why independent truckers don't want electronic tracking in their cabs. Prior to NPR, Greenfieldboyce spent a decade working in print, mostly magazines including U.S. News & World Report and New Scientist. A graduate of Johns Hopkins, earning her BA degree in social sciences and a MA degree in science writing, Greenfieldboyce taught science writing for four years at the university.

Atty. Mark Bailen, media law specialist and partner, BakerHostetler
Mark I. Bailen, a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Baker Hostetler, focuses his practice on publishing, intellectual property and commercial law matters. He represents publishing clients in a broad range of matters affecting their business including libel and privacy, newsgathering, access, freedom of information requests, copyright, and First Amendment rights. He has litigated numerous libel, access and FOIA matters on behalf of news organizations and other clients who publish and disseminate news, information, opinions and ideas. He is Legal Counsel to the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) and a Board member of the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ).


The Digital Transformation: What’s Next for Local TV News?

Thursday, Sept. 27, 1-2 p.m.

Sponsored by the Knight Foundation

While TV is a key source of news, research shows audiences for traditional broadcasts are shrinking, heading to social media, websites and "always on" digital platforms that deliver high definition video anywhere at any time. So what does that mean for local TV stations as they work to keep and engage audiences in new and different ways? Participants will come away with answers from the Knight Foundation's latest research that explores the changing digital landscape, and they'll hear how industry leaders plan to innovate and adapt.

Speakers: Bob Papper, professor emeritus, Hofstra University; Deb Halpern Wenger, assistant dean and associate professor, University of Mississippi; Ellen M. Crooke, VP of News, TEGNA Media

Click for speaker information


Bob Papper, professor emeritus, Hofstra University
Bob Papper is Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Journalism at Hofstra University. He oversees the RTDNA/Hofstra University Survey on the state of local radio and television news. He’s the founder and co-editor of Electronic News, the official division journal at AEJMC. He’s worked at television stations in Minneapolis, Washington, San Francisco, and Columbus, Ohio, and is a past president of the Maine Association of Broadcasters. He’s won more than 100 awards, including more than a dozen regional Edward R. Murrows and a duPont-Columbia. In 2012, he received the Ed Bliss Award, the highest honor from the Electronic News Division of AEJMC.

Deb Halpern Wenger, assistant dean and associate professor, University of Mississippi
Deb Halpern Wenger, a 17-year broadcast news veteran, is an assistant dean and associate professor who oversees journalism at the University of Mississippi. Prior to her academic appointments, Wenger worked as a reporter, producer and newsroom manager within multiple TV stations, including WFLA (Tampa, FL), WSOC (Charlotte, NC) and WMUR (Manchester, NH). Wenger conducts multimedia workshops in newsrooms around the country and is a trainer for SPJ in association with its Google News Initiative. She is also coauthor of two books, Advancing the Story: Journalism in a Digital World and Managing Today’s News Media: Audience First. What she's learning about journalism and new media can be found at www.advancingthestory.com. In 2018, Wenger received the Larry Burkum Service Award from the Electronic News Division of AEJMC, and she was named as a top journalism educator by NewsPro magazine in 2017.

Ellen M. Crooke, VP of News, TEGNA Media
Ellen M. Crooke was named VP of News for TEGNA Media in September of 2014. Before that she was VP of News for WXIA, Gannett’s NBC affiliate in Atlanta from 2008 to 2014 and VP of News for WGRZ in Buffalo from 2003 to 2008. She was also a Regional News Executive for Gannett from 2010 to 2014.

Prior to joining Gannett, Crooke served as News Director for WNDU in South Bend, Indiana from 1993 to 2002. Prior to that she was Assistant News Director for WHAS in Louisville, KY.

Ellen was named 2016’s TEGNA Corporate Staffer of the year and Gannett’s Innovator of the Year in 2009, Trail Blazer of the Year in 2009 by the Atlanta Business League and Local TV Person of the Year by The Buffalo News in 2007. She is the recipient of four National Edward R. Murrow Awards including Overall Excellence, Best Newscast and two Continuing Coverage awards and multiple South East Emmy Awards including Best Overall News Operation and Best Newscast.

Crooke is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo. Crooke and her husband, Stephen Hayes, have two daughters and three dogs.


Career Navigation & Work Place Culture: Understanding the Basics of Employment Contracts and Difficult Workplace Situations

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2:30-3:30 p.m.

Sponsored by SAG-AFTRA

A candid panel discussion regarding careers and career paths in journalism: seizing opportunities, making choices, negotiating with your interests in mind, and navigating challenging work environments.

Moderator: Mary E. Cavallaro, chief broadcast officer, SAG-AFTRA

Panelists: Christian Schaffer, co-anchor, WMAR; Mike Schuh, reporter, WJZ; JJ Green, national security correspondent, WTOP

Click for speaker information


Mary E. Cavallaro, chief broadcast officer, SAG-AFTRA
Mary E. Cavallaro is the Chief Broadcast Officer for the SAG-AFTRA News & Broadcast Department. Cavallaro is responsible for overseeing the negotiation and administration of more than 250 labor agreements between SAG-AFTRA and network and local broadcast employers nationwide. She also chairs national negotiations for the network news agreements, as well negotiations with employers with operations in multiple markets. Cavallaro works with the Broadcast Steering Committee on policy and matters of concern to broadcast members.

Cavallaro has served SAG-AFTRA members for more than 15 years, starting with the AFTRA Philadelphia Local, where she served as business representative/staff counsel for the AFTRA Local and SAG Philadelphia Branch, and later as a national representative/staff counsel for AFTRA. Cavallaro was Of Counsel with the firm of Montgomery, McCracken, Walker & Rhoads in Philadelphia, representing media talent and creative professionals regarding personal services contracts, production development, copyright, licensing and other intellectual property matters. She received her law degree from Villanova University School of Law and her B.A. from the University of Southern California.

Mike Schuh, reporter, WJZ
Mike Schuh (@MikeWJZ) joined the WJZ news team as a general assignment reporter in 1993. During his time at WJZ, he’s received awards for a wide range of news stories. His 11 Emmy Awards were earned in the “Best Reporter,” “Writing,” “Hard News Investigation,” “Spot News,” “General News Reporting” and “Features Reporting” categories.

In 2010, he received an Associated Press Award for “Spot News.” In 2007, he received two Associated Press Awards in the “Spot News” and “Human Interest News” categories. In 2002, Mike won a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

He volunteers as a faculty member for the prestigious National Press Photographers Association’s annual NewsVideo Workshop. He has led television storytelling seminars and workshops in Denmark and across our country. In 2008, Mike was appointed as the Regional Vice President to the Board of Governors for the Capital Area Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and served for two years.

Mike came to WJZ after learning his craft at television stations in Indianapolis, Louisville, Cape Girardeau, Mo. and Carbondale, Ill. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.

Mike, his wife, and one very, very energetic daughter, all live in Baltimore County.

JJ Green, national security correspondent, WTOP
JJ Green (@JJGreenWTOP) is the National Security Correspondent at WTOP radio. He reports daily on international security, intelligence, foreign policy, terrorism and cyber developments and provides regular on-air analysis.

He joined WTOP on March 11, 2004. In the years since then, he has traveled to dozens of countries investigating, reporting and analyzing the U.S. war against terrorism and has interviewed the leadership of all the key national security components of the U.S. government and many security and foreign government officials around the world.

He hosts the weekly podcast, Target USA, which examines the threats facing U.S. He also hosts the weekly broadcast program “The Hunt,” and conducts indepth interviews with experts on ISIS, al-Qaida, the Taliban and other emerging terror threats.

He’s been embedded with the U.S. military three times in war zones. He has reported from Kandahar, Zabul province and Kabul in Afghanistan. While embedded with the U.S. Air Force in 2006, he traveled 18,000 miles, to 10 countries, including Iraq, Djibouti, Afghanistan, Qatar, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Turkey and others in 31 days, covering the war effort.

He has traveled to Israel, the Golan Heights, Israel’s borders with Syria and Lebanon, and Gaza. He interviewed Israeli and Palestinian political officials about the conflict there and the prospects for peace, and the roadblocks. Since 2013 he has spent a lot of time in North Africa, covering the rise and fall of ISIS and the flow of foreign fighters.

He is the recipient of the 2017 Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation award for Distinguished Reporting on National Defense for his series Anatomy of a Russian attack. He has also received a National Edward R. Murrow Award (2009) for “Hidden Hunter” — his reporting aboard a nuclear-powered, Los Angeles Class submarine underway in the Atlantic Ocean. He also won the prestigious Associated Press Douglas S. Freeman award in 2010 for his investigative series, “Dignity Denied,” which explored decades of neglect at America’s hallowed Arlington National Cemetery.

He has also won more than two dozen regional and local awards since he started working at WTOP. In 2012, he was honored by the University of Maryland, University College as their commencement speaker, in recognition of his broad body of national security reporting accomplishments. He has also been recognized by top national security officials for his deep knowledge of international affairs and ability to succinctly analyze complex issues.

In addition to his work at WTOP, JJ lectures regularly at universities and colleges on national security issues and speaks often to U.S. government, military and national security organizations. He is also a contributor to Jane’s Intelligence Review magazine.

Before joining team WTOP, he traveled to and reported on the events, issues, people and places of Africa, Latin America and Europe for the six years on public and international television. He began his career in Washington in 1989 at WMAL radio. In the mid-1990s he was trained as a TV correspondent at ABC News’ “Nightline.” Later he worked as a general assignment part-time correspondent at CNN. In the late 90s he was brought on at CSPAN as weekend host of the Washington Journal. In 1998, JJ began working as a correspondent for the Voice of America Television on Window on America and as host and correspondent of Africa Journal while traveling there frequently until he joined WTOP in 2004.

JJ graduated magna cum laude from Hampton University. He’s fluent in Spanish, speaks working level French and is studying Korean. An avid athlete, he is an accomplished speed skater, a regular runner, and swimmer, cross trainer and is an expert kickboxer.

Christian Schaffer, co-anchor, WMAR
In May of 2016, Christian Schaffer (@schafferwmar) was named the co-anchor of Good Morning Maryland, after spending 10 years reporting for WMAR-2 News in Baltimore.

Christian grew up in Prince George’s and Calvert Counties, playing soccer and baseball for his schools and club teams. Before his career in television news, he worked at a crab house, a wellness office and a pizza delivery chain. If you ever meet Christian in person, feel free to ask him how much money he made as a pizza delivery driver on the night of the OJ Simpson slow-speed chase...

Christian attended the University of Richmond, where he got a first-hand look at journalism and mass communication. In 1992, the university was chosen to host one of that year’s three Presidential Debates. Christian got to volunteer with CNN, working behind the scenes on the network’s debate coverage. He went on to be a reporter, and eventually the managing editor of the university’s student newspaper, “The Collegian.”

But he had been bitten by the television news bug, and in 1994 Christian started an internship at the ABC affiliate in Richmond, WRIC. That led to a job after he graduated, working on the assignment desk. Soon he was producing newscasts for WRIC, and in 1997 he was hired as a producer for the Fox affiliate in Greensboro, North Carolina, WGHP.

Two years later it was time to move again, and Christian took a producing job with WHDH in Boston, which at the time was that city’s NBC station. After a couple years of producing morning and evening newscasts in Boston, Christian decided it was time for a change. In 2001 he started a graduate program at Boston University’s College of Communication. He earned a master’s degree in broadcast journalism, and began looking for on-air reporting jobs.

The search led Christian to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. In 2003 he was hired as a reporter at WHP, the CBS affiliate in Harrisburg. He covered politics, crime, fires, floods and whatever else you can think of for that station’s evening newscasts. In 2005 Christian provided extensive coverage of the “Intelligent Design” trial, which brought national attention to the federal courthouse in Harrisburg.

His final move happened less than a year later. In June of 2006 Christian came to Baltimore, and started working as a reporter for WMAR’s 11pm newscast. Over the next 10 years he covered just about every big story his home state had to offer, from state and local politics to crime, severe weather and breaking news.

In 2012 Christian provided extensive live coverage from Charlottesville, Virginia, of the murder trial of the man who was eventually convicted of killing University of Virginia student Yeardley Love, who grew up in Baltimore County. Christian has covered the cases of people who died in police custody in Baltimore City, including Anthony Anderson, Tyrone West and Freddie Gray — and he reported live from Mondawmin Mall during the unrest in Baltimore that started after Gray’s funeral.

He covered the post-conviction hearing of Adnan Syed, the man convicted of killing his ex-girlfriend Hae Min Lee back in 1999, whose case was featured on the podcast “Serial.” Syed was granted a new trial, which remains in the appeal process.

Christian also covered the Baltimore Orioles’ playoff run in 2012, with live coverage from the Wild Card win in Texas, and from New York for the Orioles’ series against the Yankees. He watched Nate McLouth’s fly ball hit the foul pole at Yankee Stadium in Game 5, which meant that it should have been called a home run, but was not.

In 2013 Christian spent a week in New Orleans covering the Baltimore Ravens’ trip to the Super Bowl. He was in the Superdome when the lights went out, and on the field interviewing players after the Ravens secured the franchise’s second Super Bowl win.

Now, you can watch Christian, along with Ashley James, Lynette Charles and Lauren Cook on Good Morning Maryland, every weekday morning from 4:30 to 7a.m.

Christian lives in Baltimore with his wife and daughter, who are both amazingly patient with his sleep schedule. He enjoys reading, trips to the beach and from time to time he’ll play a round of golf, poorly.



Help/Contact  •   Future EIJ locations
Info for SPJ Leaders